Awards & Recognition

The Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA), Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center (HPCC), and Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation (HPNF) offer various opportunities annually for members, certificants, and others to be recognized for their contributions toward advancing expert care in serious illness. Annual awards recognize the work of all hospice and palliative care professionals from across the country, as well as friends of HPNA, HPCC, and HPNF.

Advanced Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse of the Year Award

The annual Advanced Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse of the Year Award recognizes the work of all hospice/palliative advanced practice nurses from across the country.

Download the HPCC Awards Nomination Form 
Recipients
  • 2017 ACHPN® of the Year- Kimberly Chow, RN ANP-BC, ACHPN®
  • 2016 ACHPN® of the Year- Joan G. Carpenter, MN, CRNP, ACHPN®
  • 2015 ACHPN® of the Year- Gwen Dodson, RN, MSN, ANP-BC, ACHPN®
  • 2014 ACHPN® of the Year- Kerstin McSteen, RN, MS, ACNS-BC, ACHPN®
  • 2013 ACHPN® of the Year- Kathryn Lanz, DNP, ANP, GNP, ACHPN®
  • 2012 ACHPN® of the Year- Jennifer Gentry, RN, MSN, ANP-BC, FPCN, ACHPN®
  • 2011 ACHPN® of the Year- M. Michelle Porthouse, NP-C, ACHPN®
  • 2010 ACHPN® of the Year- Niki Koesel, RN, MSN, APN, ACHPN®
  • 2009 ACHPN® of the Year– Carol Matthews, CNS, ACHPN®
APN of the Year
  • 2007 APN of the Year– Connie Dahlin, MSN, APRN, BC-PCM
  • 2006 APN of the Year– Maryjo Prince-Paul, MSN, APRN, BC-PCM
Award
  • One application fee for renewal of the advanced practice certification and a two-year complimentary membership to the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
  • A plaque presented to the award recipient*
Eligibility
  • Current member of HPNA (members of the HPCC board, Examination Development Committees, and Awards Selection Committee are ineligible)
  • Advanced Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse (ACHPN®)
Criteria
  • Individual personifies excellence in the professional practice of advanced practice hospice/palliative nursing
  • Individual has made contributions at the advanced practice level in at least one of the following areas of hospice/palliative care: clinical practice, education or research
  • Individual provides leadership through mentorship of others in hospice/palliative care
Judging
  • All nominations are reviewed and the recipient is selected by the Awards Selection Committee of HPCC
Submission Requirements
  • HPCC Awards Nomination Form (click this link to download form)
  • Document written by nominator of how nominee meets the criteria with further elaboration on his or her qualifications for this award (e.g., relevant employment, involvement in special initiatives related to hospice/palliative advance practice nursing care) This document should be no more than two (2) pages 8 x 11
  • Two (2) letters of support from others in the field who can provide validation of nominee contribution to hospice/palliative advanced practice nursing
  • Current curriculum vitae / resume

Required materials must be RECEIVED by July 1 of given year via email (hpcc@gohpcc.org), fax (412-787-9305) or postal mail.

Mail completed materials to:

HPCC
Awards Selection Committee
One Penn Center West Suite 425
Pittsburgh, PA 15276

*The recipient of the award is strongly encouraged to receive the award in person based on instructions in the award recipient letter. A monetary stipend has been established to assist with travel costs and related expenses.

Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse of the Year Award

The annual CHPN® of the Year Award recognizes the work of all hospice/palliative nurses from across the country.

Download the HPCC Awards Nomination Form

 

Recipients
  • 2017 CHPN® of the Year- Denise DiMare, RN, BSN,  CHPN®
  • 2016 CHPN® of the Year- Ann Schneidman, MN RN CNS CHPN®
  • 2015 CHPN® of the Year- Candace Baker, RN, BSN, CHPN®
  • 2014 CHPN® of the Year- Amanda Broyles, RN, BSN, CHPN®
  • 2013 CHPN® of the Year- Brad Macy, RN, BSN, CHPN®
  • 2012 CHPN® of the Year- Jennifer Scheible, RN, BSN, CHPN®
  • 2011 CHPN® of the Year- Debi Bach Clancy, BSN, RN,CHPN®
  • 2010 CHPN® of the Year- Florence LeClair, RN, BSN, CHPN®
  • 2009 CHPN® of the Year– Donna Nolde, MA, CHPN®, CT
  • 2008 CHPN® of the Year– Marilyn Berwick, RN, CCM, CHPN®
  • 2007 CHPN® of the Year– Hazel Jackson, APRN, BC, RN-C, CHPN®
  • 2005 CHPN® of the Year– Cathy Brown, RN, CHPN®
  • 2004 CHPN® of the Year– Patricia Martino, RN, CHPN®
  • 2003 CHPN® of the Year– Marie Bakitas, RN, CHPN®
  • 2002 CHPN®/CRNH of the Year– Pam Ketzner, RN, CHPN®
  • 2000 CHPN®/CRNH of the Year– Karole Thomas, RN, CHPN®
  • 1999 CHPN®/CRNH of the Year– Lisa Szczepaniak, RN, CHPN®
  • 1998 CHPN®/CRNH of the Year– Joan Prentice, RN, CRNH
CRNH of the Year
  • 1997 CRNH of the Year- Opal Umpierre, RN, CRNH
  • 1996 CRNH of the Year– Mary Ann Coletta, RN, CRNH
  • 1995 CRNH of the Year– Diana Peirce, RN, CRNH
Award
  • One application fee for renewal of the CHPN® certification and a two-year complimentary membership to the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
  • A plaque presented to the award recipient*
Eligibility
  • Current member of HPNA (members of the HPCC board, Examination Development Committees, and Awards Selection Committee are ineligible)
  • Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse (CHPN®)
Criteria
  • Individual personifies excellence in the professional practice of hospice/palliative nursing
  • Individual has made contributions in at least one of the following areas of hospice/palliative care: clinical practice, education or research
  • Individual provides leadership through mentorship of others in hospice/palliative care
Judging
  • All nominations are reviewed and the recipient is selected by the Awards Selection Committee of HPCC
Submission Requirements
  • HPCC Awards Nomination Form (click this link to download form)
  • Document written by nominator of how nominee meets the criteria with further elaboration on his or her qualifications for this award (e.g., relevant employment, involvement in special initiatives related to hospice/palliative nursing care). This document should be no more than two (2) pages 8 x 11
  • Two (2) letters of support from others in the field who can provide validation of nominee contribution to hospice/palliative nursing
  • Current curriculum vitae / resume

Required materials must be RECEIVED by July 1 of given year via email (hpcc@gohpcc.org), fax (412-787-9305) or postal mail.

Mail completed materials to:

HPCC
Awards Selection Committee
One Penn Center West Suite 425
Pittsburgh, PA 15276

*The recipient of the award is strongly encouraged to receive the award in person based on instructions in the award recipient letter. A monetary stipend has been established to assist with travel costs and related expenses.

Certified Hospice and Palliative Pediatric Nurse of the Year Award

The annual CHPPN® of the Year Award recognizes the work of all hospice/palliative pediatric nurses from across the country.

Download the HPCC Awards Nomination Form

 

Recipients
  • 2017 CHPPN® of the Year- Verna Hendricks-Ferguson, PhD, RN, CHPPN®, FPCN®, FAAN
  • 2016 CHPPN® of the Year- Susan O’Conner-Von, PhD, RN-BC, CHPPN®
  • 2014 CHPPN® of the Year- Diane Parker, MSN, NE-BC, CHPN®, CHPPN®
Award
  • One application fee for renewal of the CHPPN® certification and a two-year complimentary membership to the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
  • A plaque presented to the award recipient*
Eligibility
  • Current member of HPNA (members of the HPCC board, Examination Development Committees, and Awards Selection Committee are ineligible)
  • Certified Hospice and Palliative Pediatric Nurse (CHPPN®)
Criteria
  • Individual personifies excellence in the professional practice of hospice/palliative pediatric nursing
  • Individual has made contributions in at least one of the following areas of hospice/palliative pediatric care: clinical practice, education or research
  • Individual provides leadership through mentorship of others in hospice/palliative pediatric care
Judging
  • All nominations are reviewed and the recipient is selected by the Awards Selection Committee of HPCC
Submission Requirements
  • HPCC Awards Nomination Form (click this link to download form)
  • Document written by nominator of how nominee meets the criteria with further elaboration on his or her qualifications for this award (e.g., relevant employment, involvement in special initiatives related to hospice/palliative pediatric nursing care) This document should be no more than two (2) pages 8 x 11
  • Two (2) letters of support from others in the field who can provide validation of nominee contribution to hospice/palliative pediatric nursing
  • Current curriculum vitae / resume

Required materials must be RECEIVED by July 1 of given year via email (hpcc@gohpcc.org), fax (412-787-9305) or postal mail.

Mail completed materials to:

HPCC
Awards Selection Committee
One Penn Center West Suite 425
Pittsburgh, PA 15276

*The recipient of the award is strongly encouraged to receive the award in person based on instructions in the award recipient letter. A monetary stipend has been established to assist with travel costs and related expenses.

Certified Hospice and Palliative Licensed/Vocational Nurse of the Year Award

The annual CHPLN® of the Year Award recognizes the work of all hospice/palliative licensed practical/vocational nurses from across the country.

Download the HPCC Awards Nomination Form

 

Recipients
  • 2017 CHPLN® of the Year- Susanne May, LPN, CHPLN®, CHA
  • 2016 CHPLN® of the Year- Shelly Thomas, LPN, CHPLN®,
  • 2015 CHPLN® of the Year- Kimberly Simmons, LPN, CHPLN®,
  • 2014 CHPLN® of the Year- Ottamissiah Moore, LPN, BS, CHPLN®, WCC, CLNI
  • 2013 CHPLN® of the Year- Kathleen Emerson, LPN, CHPLN®
  • 2012 CHPLN® of the Year– Jonathon Etou, LPN, BS, CHPLN®
  • 2010 CHPLN® of the Year- Tracey Judkins, LPN, CHPLN®
  • 2008 CHPLN® of the Year– J. Sue Bloodnick, LPN, CHPLN®
  • 2007 CHLPN® of the Year– Charlene Kranitz, LPN, CHPLN®
Award
  • One application fee for renewal of the CHPLN® certification and a two-year complimentary membership to the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
  • A plaque presented to the award recipient*
Eligibility
  • Current member of HPNA (members of the HPCC board, Examination Development Committees, and Awards Selection Committee are ineligible)
  • Certified Hospice and Palliative Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse (CHPLN®)
Criteria
  • Individual personifies excellence in the professional practice of hospice/palliative licensed practical/vocational nursing
  • Individual seeks opportunities for advancement of knowledge and experience in hospice/palliative licensed practical/vocational nursing practice
  • Individual provides leadership through mentorship of others in hospice/palliative care
Judging
  • All nominations are reviewed and the recipient is selected by the Awards Selection Committee of HPCC
Submission Requirements
  • HPCC Awards Nomination Form (click this link to download form)
  • Document written by nominator of how nominee meets the criteria with further elaboration on his or her qualifications for this award (e.g., relevant employment, involvement in special initiatives related to hospice/palliative licensed practical/vocational nursing care) This document should be no more than two (2) pages 8 x 11
  • Two (2) letters of support from others in the field who can provide validation of nominee contribution to hospice/palliative licensed practical/vocational nursing
  • Current curriculum vitae / resume

Required materials must be RECEIVED by July 1 of given year via email (hpcc@gohpcc.org), fax (412-787-9305) or postal mail.

Mail completed materials to:

HPCC
Awards Selection Committee
One Penn Center West Suite 425
Pittsburgh, PA 15276

*The recipient of the award is strongly encouraged to receive the award in person based on instructions in the award recipient letter. A monetary stipend has been established to assist with travel costs and related expenses.

Certified Hospice and Palliative Nursing Assistant of the Year Award

The annual CHPNA® of the Year Award recognizes the work of all hospice/palliative nursing assistants from across the country.

Download the HPCC Awards Nomination Form

 

Recipients
  • 2017 CHPNA® of the Year – Sabrina Madrid, STNA, CHPNA®
  • 2016 CHPNA® of the Year – Sarah Collett, CNA, CHPNA®
  • 2013 CHPNA® of the Year – Debra L. Thompson, CNA, CHPNA®
  • 2011 CHPNA® of the Year – Dana Goodwin, CHPNA®
  • 2009 CHPNA® of the Year – Rose LaDue, CHPNA®
  • 2007 CHPNA® of the Year – William Parrott, CNA, CHPNA®
  • 2006 CHPNA® of the Year – Socorro Peebles, CHPNA®, CNA, HHA
  • 2005 CHPNA® of the Year – Amy Nicole Henely, CHPNA®
  • 2004 CHPNA® of the Year – Connie Brennan, CHPNA®
Award
  • One application fee for renewal of the CHPNA® certification and a two-year complimentary membership to the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
  • A plaque presented to the award recipient*
Eligibility
  • Current member of HPNA (members of the HPCC board, Examination Development Committees, and Awards Selection Committee are ineligible)
  • Certified Hospice and Palliative Nursing Assistant (CHPNA®)
Criteria
  • Individual personifies excellence in the clinical practice as a hospice/palliative nursing assistant
  • Individual provides leadership through mentorship of others in hospice/palliative care
Judging
  • All nominations are reviewed and the recipient is selected by the Awards Selection Committee of HPCC
Submission Requirements
  • HPCC Awards Nomination Form (click this link to download form)
  • Document written by nominator of how nominee meets the criteria with further elaboration on his or her qualifications for this award (e.g., relevant employment, involvement in special initiatives related to hospice/palliative nursing assistant care) This document should be no more than two (2) pages 8 x 11
  • Two (2) letters of support from others in the field who can provide validation of nominee contribution to hospice/palliative nursing assistant practice
  • Current curriculum vitae / resume

Required materials must be RECEIVED by July 1 of given year via email (hpcc@gohpcc.org), fax (412-787-9305) or postal mail.

Mail completed materials to:

HPCC
Awards Selection Committee
One Penn Center West Suite 425
Pittsburgh, PA 15276

*The recipient of the award is strongly encouraged to receive the award in person based on instructions in the award recipient letter. A monetary stipend has been established to assist with travel costs and related expenses.

Certified Hospice and Palliative Care Administrator of the Year Award

The annual CHPCA® of the Year Award recognizes the work of all hospice/palliative care administrators from across the country.

Download the HPCC Awards Nomination Form

 

Recipients
  • 2017 CHPCA® of the Year- Robert Phillips-Plona, MSN, MBA, RN, CHPN®, CHPCA®
  • 2016 CHPCA® of the Year- Amy Scheu, MSN, CHPCA®
  • 2015 CHPCA® of the Year- Melanie Cama, RN, BSN, CHPCA®
  • 2014 CHPCA® of the Year- Lori Yosick, LISW-S, CHPCA®
  • 2012 CHPCA® of the Year– Rhada Hartmann, RN, BSN, CT, CHPCA®
Award
  • One application fee for renewal of the CHPCA® certification and a two-year complimentary membership to the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
  • A plaque presented to the award recipient*
Eligibility
  • Current member of HPNA (members of the HPCC board, Examination Development Committees, and Awards Selection Committee are ineligible)
  • Certified Hospice and Palliative Care Administrator (CHPCA®)
Criteria
  • Individual personifies excellence in the professional practice of hospice/palliative care administration
  • Individual has made contributions in hospice/palliative care administration
  • Individual provides leadership through mentorship of others in hospice/palliative care
Judging
  • All nominations are reviewed and the recipient is selected by the Awards Selection Committee of HPCC
Submission Requirements
  • HPCC Awards Nomination Form (click this link to download form)
  • Document written by nominator of how nominee meets the criteria with further elaboration on his or her qualifications for this award (e.g., relevant employment, involvement in special initiatives related to hospice/palliative care administration) This document should be no more than two (2) pages 8 x 11
  • Two (2) letters of support from others in the field who can provide validation of nominee contribution to hospice/palliative care administration
  • Current curriculum vitae / resume

Required materials must be RECEIVED by July 1 of given year via email (hpcc@gohpcc.org), fax (412-787-9305) or postal mail.

Mail completed materials to:

HPCC
Awards Selection Committee
One Penn Center West Suite 425
Pittsburgh, PA 15276

*The recipient of the award is strongly encouraged to receive the award in person based on instructions in the award recipient letter. A monetary stipend has been established to assist with travel costs and related expenses.

Certified in Perinatal Loss Care of the Year Award

The annual CPLC® of the Year Award recognizes the work of perinatal loss care professionals from across the country.

Download the HPCC Awards Nomination Form

 

Previous Recipient
  • 2015 CPLC® of the Year- Jennifer Marie Jonely, RN, MSN, RNC-OB, CPLC®
Award
  • One application fee for renewal of the CPLC® certification and a two-year complimentary membership to the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association
  • A plaque presented to the award recipient*
Eligibility
  • Current member of HPNA (members of the HPCC board, Examination Development Committees, and Awards Selection Committee are ineligible)
  • Certified in Perinatal Loss Care (CPLC®)
Criteria
  • Individual personifies excellence in their professional practice
  • Individual has made contributions in at least one of the following areas of care: clinical practice, education or research
  • Individual provides leadership through mentorship of others in perinatal loss care
Judging
  • All nominations are reviewed and the recipient is selected by the Awards Selection Committee of HPCC
Submission Requirements
  • HPCC Awards Nomination Form (click this link to download form)
  • Document written by nominator of how nominee meets the criteria with further elaboration on his or her qualifications for this award (e.g., relevant employment, involvement in special initiatives related to perinatal loss care) This document should be no more than two (2) pages 8 x 11
  • Two (2) letters of support from others in the field who can provide validation of nominee contribution to perinatal loss practice
  • Current curriculum vitae / resume

Required materials must be RECEIVED by July 1 of given year via email (hpcc@gohpcc.org), fax (412-787-9305) or postal mail.

Mail completed materials to:

HPCC
Awards Selection Committee
One Penn Center West Suite 425
Pittsburgh, PA 15276

*The recipient of the award is strongly encouraged to receive the award in person based on instructions in the award recipient letter. A monetary stipend has been established to assist with travel costs and related expenses.

Employer of the Year Award

The Employer of the Year Award is an annual award presented to an organization that has provided sustained support of the HPCC certification program for hospice and palliative caregivers. The first Employer of the Year award was awarded in 2006 to Columbus Hospice in Columbus, GA. Columbus Hospice continues to demonstrate support of its nurses and their certification accomplishments.

Recipients
  • 2017 Kindrid Hospice, San Marcos, Texas
  • 2016 Hospice & Community Care, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
  • 2015 Hospice Family Care, Huntsville, Alabama
  • 2014 Hospice of Northwest Ohio, Perrysburg, Ohio
  • 2013 Hospice of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio
  • 2012 Hospice Care of South Carolina, Spartanburg, South Carolina
  • 2011 York Hospital WellSpan Health, York, Pennsylvania
  • 2009/10 Hospice of Southern Illinois, Belleville, Illinois
  • 2008 Home Hospice, Odessa, Texas
  • 2007 Hospice of the Comforter, Altamonte Springs, Florida
  • 2006 Columbus Hospice, Columbus, Georgia
Award
  • The Employer of the Year Award recipient will be featured in an issue of the HPCC certification newsletter.
  • Gift item presented to the award recipient*
Criteria
  • The employer demonstrates a history of supporting certification and is currently enrolled in the HPCC Employer Supporter Program
  • The employer actively endorses and promotes certification, demonstrated by such actions as:
    • Financial support for certification examination and/or preparation for the examination
    • Salary recognition upon attainment and renewal of HPCC credentials
    • Facility recognition activities for achievement of HPCC credentials
    • Incorporation of certification into job descriptions or clinical ladder
Selection
  • Annual update form (which is mailed to eligible employers annually) must be submitted to the HPCC national office by July 1st deadline.
  • An organization/facility which employs members of the HPCC Board are not eligible to receive this award during the term of the board member.
  • Selection will be determined by the HPCC Awards Selection Subcommittee/Board.
  • An organization /facility cannot be selected more than once in a 10-year period.

*The recipient of the award is strongly encouraged to receive the award in person based on instructions in the award recipient letter. A monetary stipend has been established to assist with travel costs and related expenses.

If you have any further questions regarding the Employer Supporter Program or the Employer of the Year Award, please contact HPCC at hpcc@gohpcc.org) or 412-787-1057.

HPNA Vanguard Award

The HPNA Vanguard Award, previously known as the Leading the Way Award, recognizes a nursing leader who has uniquely advanced expert care in serious illness. The recipient is recognized for outstanding leadership skills and commitment to the vision of HPNA and to our Pillars of Excellence: Advocacy, Education, Research, and Leadership.

Eligibility
  • Has made a significant contribution to HPNA.
  • Has been a part of a leading edge development for the organization.
  • HPNA member.
  • Nominations will be screened by the HPNA Membership Engagement Advisory Council who will make recommendations to the HPNA Board of Directors for approval.

Nominate Someone For This Award

Vanguard Award (formerly Leading the Way Award) Recipients
2017 Barbara Head, PhD, RN, CHPN, FPCN

Dr. Head is currently an associate professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Palliative Care and Medical Education, and is an affiliated faculty member at the university’s Kent School of Social Work. She is a registered nurse with advanced degrees (MSSW, PhD) in social work. Dr. Head has been involved in hospice and palliative care initiatives for over 30 years serving as a hospice board member, volunteer, home care nurse, educator, quality improvement coordinator, educator, and researcher.

She has been certified in hospice and palliative nursing for over 15 years, and has served as both a member and as president of the board of directors for the Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center and the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association, where she was honored in 2011 as a Fellow in Palliative Care Nursing (FPCN). Dr. Head is a board member and treasurer of the Social Work Hospice and Palliative Network, and has taught for the End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) both nationally and in India and Malaysia.

Dr. Head’s current research focuses on interprofessional education in palliative care, lung cancer survivorship programs, socioeconomic factors influencing cancer care, and telehealth interventions in cancer. She is interested educationally in the development and analysis of reflective capacity in students and the use of contemporary film to stimulate critical thinking related to death and grief theories and issues.

2016 June Lunney, PhD, RN

As the extramural program director at the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 1991 until 1999, Dr. June Lunney participated in the creation of federal support for research on end-of-life issues. She organized the first NIH workshop on end-of-life care in 1997 and founded the Trans-NIH Palliative Care Group. She later worked at the Center for End-of-Life Care at RAND, where she was a major contributor to a study on the costs and use of care. She was the lead author on the 2003 Institute of Medicine’s report Describing Death in America: What We Need To Know. Dr. Lunney served as the associate dean for research at West Virginia University from 2003 to 2008 and as HPNA’s first director of research from 2010 until 2015.

Dr. Lunney has advanced palliative care through her role on multiple national committees and task forces. She chaired the 2004 NIH State of the Science End-of-Life Care Conference planning committee, served on the technical advisory group for the Assistant Secretary of Health’s project to improve end-of-life care in Medicare, and co-chaired the National Quality Forum’s steering committee on palliative and end-of-life care.

Dr. Lunney received funding from NIH to study trajectories of dying. In 2003 she published a seminal paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which provided empirical support for different patterns of functional decline at the end-of-life. Her current research links decision making, physical and cognitive function, symptom burden, and healthcare utilization in advanced old age.

2015 Brenda Clarkson, RN

Brenda Clarkson is Executive Director of the Virginia Association for Hospice & Palliative Care. In the course of her stellar career, she has made numerous professional contributions, which include: serving as a founding board member of the Hospice Nurses Association (now the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association) and as the second president of the association; founding board member and the first president of the National Board for Certification of Hospice Nurses (now the Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center).

Ms. Clarkson has served in numerous clinical and administrative positions, which include; hospice nurse, clinical manager and administrator. She founded the first hospital-based inpatient hospice unit in Virginia. In addition, she has developed, marketed, and implemented a comprehensive range of consultative services for hospice and home health agencies. Ms. Clarkson has developed and implemented numerous innovative programs and services that have improved the delivery of hospice and palliative care services to patients and their families. Some of these initiatives include: a virtual Quality Improvement department with hospice clients, an orientation program for hospice nurses and a system-wide project to integrate palliative care into a Catholic Health System.

Ms. Clarkson has presented at state and national conferences on topics ranging from compassion fatigue, improving nurse retention through mind/body technologies, communication skills, documentation for compliance, developmental stages of hospice team members, and regulatory compliance and clinical excellence. She recently co-authored a book, The Heart of Hospice: Core Competencies for Reclaiming the Mystery, with the intent of preventing the heart of hospice from being lost in the midst of challenges currently facing hospice programs.

2014 Nessa Coyle, ACHPN, PhD, FAAN

The HPNA Leading the Way award recognizes a nursing leader who has pioneered an innovative and novel approach to palliative nursing, demonstrating a deep and abiding commitment to furthering the philosophy, mission, and quality of palliative nursing. For her continuous research, her focus on furthering patient goals of care, and her extensive scholarly and professional nursing leadership, we honor our 2014 recipient, Nessa Coyle, ACHPN, PhD, FAAN.

Dr. Coyle’s development of one of the first Nurse Fellowship programs in the US designed for advanced practice nurses in pain and palliative care, and her considerable research with its focus on palliative nursing, end-of-life care, and clinical bioethics, mark her commitment to changing lives and improving outcomes. Former Director of the Supportive Care Program of the Pain and Palliative Care Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), she retired in 2012 after 40 years of service. The Nurse Fellowship program that she initiated at MSKCC is now over two decades old.

Dr. Coyle co-authored, with Dr. Betty Farrell, the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing, a core resource text for the palliative care field. She is a co-leader of the HPNA Bioethics special interest group, which launched in 2013. Dr. Coyle is on the editorial boards of several interdisciplinary palliative care journals, including both the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management and the Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. A member of the International End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) faculty, Dr. Coyle lectures both nationally and internationally. She is on the Board of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York Hospice program and is active in a variety of other community programs associated with palliative care and end-of-life care.

2013 Jane Marie Kirschling, DNS, RN, FAAN

Dr. Kirschling serves as Dean and Professor, School of Nursing and University Director of Interprofessional Education at the University of Maryland in Baltimore. Dr. Kirschling is past president of HPNA and served on numerous committees specific to governance, education, and research during her tenure. Additionally, she was board representative to the Coalition for Hospice and Palliative Care and the Alliance for Excellence in Hospice and Palliative Nursing. A major re-structuring of board and committee processes, designed to increase participation of HPNA members in the work of the association, occurred during her board tenure as Co-Chairperson of the Transitions Task Force. As a result of this re-design, HPNA now realizes over 300 member volunteers annually who contribute thousands of hours to our association’s work product. She served as an HPNA representative to the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine’s Annual Assembly Steering Committee (2000-2002). Dr. Kirschling previously served on the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation Board of Directors and is also a former HPNF president. Her contributions to both HPNF and HPNA continue in her current role as a member of the Palliative Nursing Leadership Institute Planning Committee.

2012 Virginia Tilden, DNSc, RN, FAAN

Virginia Tilden is Dean Emerita, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing; Professor Emerita, Oregon Health & Science University; and currently serves as Chairperson on the American Academy of Nursing Task Force on Policy and End-of-Life Care. She was previously Director of the Program of Research on End of Life Care, Center for Ethics in Health Care, at Oregon Health & Science University (1990-2003).

Dr. Tilden has received continuous National Institutes of Health funding over the past 20 years for research on improving care at the end of life, focused especially in three areas: advance care planning; the impact on families of making decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment; and palliative end-of-life care in nursing homes. She has over 50 data-based publications on care at the end of life in high impact journals, including The New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Geriatric Society and Journal of Palliative Medicine.

Dr. Tilden has received numerous honors and awards, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Midwest Nursing Research Society, the Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher Award from the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research, a Distinguished Faculty Award for Research from the Oregon Health & Science University; the Helen Nahm Distinguished Research Award from the University of California San Francisco; and the Youmans Spaulding Distinguished Professorship Award from the Oregon Health & Science University. She was also inducted as a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 1988.

2011 Madalon O’Rawe Amenta, RN, MN, PhD

Dr. Amenta is being acknowledged with this year’s award for her remarkable work as the Executive Director of the Hospice Nurses Association (HPNA) from 1993 through 1997.

Madalon O’Rawe Amenta, RN, MN, PhD, dedicated her career to community nursing and was inspired to join the hospice movement in the 1970s after having read Elisabeth Kübler Ross’ On Death and Dying. After serving on the hospice planning committee at Pittsburgh Hospital, she eventually became Director of Education and Research at Forbes Hospice. This, in turn, led to founding the Pennsylvania Hospice Network and serving two terms as its first president. Her illustrious career has also included being a hospice career-related researcher, author, editor, academic educator, and mentor. She has received numerous honors in recognition of her caring work.

Some of her many professional honors include the Heart of Hospice Award from the National Hospice Organization in 1998; National Hospice Organization President’s Award of Excellence for a publication in the Hospice Staff Training and Development Category for the manual Quality Assurance for Hospice Patient Care, 1988; American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year in the Gerontologic Nursing Category for Nursing Care of the Terminally Ill, 1986; and the Yale University School of Nursing Distinguished Alumna Award, 1982.

2010 Ida M. Martinson, BS, MS, PhD, FAAN

Dr. Martinson’s career began as a diploma graduate of St. Luke’s Hospital School of Nursing in Duluth, MN. She earned her BS and Master’s degrees in Nursing Administration from the University of Minnesota. In, 1972 she earned a PhD in Physiology from the University of Illinois, where she continued to serve as a lecturer in the department of physiology and became a professor in the school of nursing in 1977. Dr. Martinson was then recruited by the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF) in 1982, where she worked in a well established research program focusing on the care of children with terminal illnesses.

During her years at UCSF, she took a leave of absence to serve as chair of nursing and head of the department of health sciences at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in Hong Kong. Having spent many years as a consultant to nursing schools in various Asian countries, Dr. Martinson has a longstanding commitment to Asian cultures and has extensively studied the impact of childhood cancer on the child and family and care giving practices of Chinese, Taiwanese, and Korean families.

Dr. Martinson has received national and international recognition for her work, which includes more than 100 published articles, 65 book chapters, and six books. She is recognized for her willingness to share her data with young investigators as a mentor. She has held numerous visiting professorships, served on editorial boards, and received the Humanitarian Award from Pediatric Nursing.

2009 Denice Sheehan, PhD, RN
Deborah Witt Sherman, PhD, APRN, ANP-BC, ACHPN®, FAAN
Co-recipients of the 2009 Leading the Way Award.

Dr. Sheehan and Dr. Sherman are being acknowledged with this year’s award for their remarkable efforts to further enhance the quality of nursing care through leading the way in graduate hospice and palliative care education.

Dr. Sheehan is an Assistant Professor at the Kent State University College of Nursing in Kent, Ohio, where she teaches both graduate and undergraduate level courses. Before her professorship with Kent State, Dr. Sheehan served as Coordinator with the Palliative Care Program at the Ursuline College Breen School of Nursing in Pepper Pike, Ohio.

In the area of research, Dr. Sheehan has extensive experience investigating the interaction patterns between parents with advanced cancer in hospice and their adolescent children. She has given professional presentations on the topics of communication near the end of life, nursing research, palliative care, palliative nursing in academia, and decision making at the end of life. Dr. Sheehan’s work has been published in numerous journals and texts, including the American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, American Journal of Nursing, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Textbook of Palliative Nursing, and Hospice and Palliative Care: Concepts and Practice. Since 1999, Dr. Sheehan also has served on the Advisory Board and Faculty of the End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC).

Dr. Sherman is an Associate Professor with tenure within the division of nursing at NYU, where she has also served as Acting Director of the Doctoral Program in Nursing and coordinator of the Advanced Practice Palliative Care Master’s and Post-Master’s Certificate Programs. She also provides palliative care and education across seven skilled nursing and assisted living facilities as Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner and Educator at the Regional Hospice of Western Connecticut located in Danbury, CT.

As an accomplished researcher, her interests include breast cancer education and counseling, palliative and oncology care, quality of life, symptom management, and AIDS/HIV. She has presented widely and published extensively on a variety of subjects relating to end-of-life and palliative care, including patient fatigue, culturally competent care, and suffering of the caregiver. Her work has also appeared in such diverse journals as American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Medicine and American Journal of Nursing. In 2008, she received the Outstanding Contribution to the College of Palliative Care from the Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Dr. Sherman also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.

2008 Jeanne Quint Benoliel, DNSc, RN, FAAN

Dr. Jeanne Quint Benoliel graduated from St. Luke’s Hospital School of Nursing in San Francisco, served in the United States Army Nurse Corp., received her B.S. from Oregon State University, her Master’s from the University of California, Los Angeles and her DNSc from the University of California, San Francisco. Her commitment to the care of the dying began with her work with Barney Glaser and Anselm Strauss. She continued her work studying patterns of communication and behaviors of the terminally ill. As a result of her studies, Dr. Benoliel was able to document that the care for the dying destroyed quality of life in their final moments, was misdirected and expensive secondary to the flurry of invasive activities noted at that time. She has taught courses, written extensively and conducted many workshops on end of life care. She was the first to bring in the family in terms of the unit of care. She was well ahead of her time. Dr. Benoliel was the first nurse president of the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement. She is recognized as one of the founders in the field of hospice and palliative care. Through her work and teaching, she has transformed nursing care for the dying as well as shaped the field of palliative and hospice care. HPNA is quite honored to recognize this wonderful nursing leader as the 2008 HPNA Leading the Way award winner.

2007 Pamela S. Hinds, RN, MSN, PhD, FAAN

Dr. Pamela Hinds is the Director, Division of Nursing Research at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, TN, a full member of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as well as an Adjunct Professor at the University of Tennessee, College of Nursing and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. With more than 25 years experience in research, Dr. Hinds has been the principle investigator of numerous research grants is widely published with more than 150 manuscripts, as well as textbooks, guidebooks, monographs and book chapters and has been the recipient of numerous awards. Dr. Hinds’ primary interest in research includes decision making, quality of life, fatigue and end of life. She is actively involved in many ways with the Children’s Oncology Group as well as the Oncology Nursing Society where she chaired the ONS Multi-site Research Project Team and was a member of the National Quality Forum Review Committee, Framework and Preferred Practices for Palliative and Hospice Care Quality. Dr. Hinds presents extensively and currently serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing and as a reviewer for many other peer reviewed journals. Dr. Hinds credits her husband, as well as sons Ben and Adam, for all these successes.

2006 HPNA Past-Presidents

The HPNA Leading the Way Award recognizes a nursing leader who has “led the way” in hospice and palliative nursing. The 2006 recipients of this award are the 11 HPNA Past-Presidents, honored for their contributions as nursing leaders in end-of-life nursing.

2005 Madalon Amenta, RN, MN, PhD

The HPNA Leading the Way Award recognizes a nursing leader who has “led the way” in hospice and palliative nursing. The HPNA Board of Directors has chosen Madalon O’Rawe Amenta RN, MN, PhD to be honored in 2005 for a multitude of contributions as a nursing leader in end-of-life care.

Madalon Amenta, the nurse, was inspired to join the hospice movement in the 1970s after having read Elisabeth Kübler Ross’ On Death and Dying. After serving on the hospice planning committee at Pittsburgh Hospital she eventually became Director of Education and Research at Forbes Hospice. This, in turn, led to founding the Pennsylvania Hospice Network and serving two terms as its first president. Her illustrious career has also included being a hospice career-related researcher, author, editor, academic educator, and mentor. She has received numerous honors in recognition of her caring work. Madalon Amenta is the recipient of the 2005 HPNA’s “Leading the Way” Award.

2004 Florence Wald, BA, MN, MS, PhD

The HPNA Leading the Way Award is intended to recognize a nursing leader who has led the way in hospice and palliative nursing. The first recipient of this award was indeed born a nursing leader. Experiences from the early days of her life forged the values, ethics and passion to become, as HPNA affectionately calls her, the “mother of hospice and palliative nursing”. The HPNA Board of Directors proudly announces that this individual is Dr. Florence Wald, the nursing pioneer for establishing hospice in America. Through her leadership and commitment, hospice care was initiated in the United States in 1974. Her influence has continued over the last 2½ decades as healthcare leaders in America have joined together to improve end of life care in America.

Dr. Wald, a nursing graduate of Mt. Holyoke College, earned a Masters in Nursing and a Masters in Science from Yale University. Her illustrious career has included serving as researcher, academic educator, dean, author, and speaker. She is currently a Clinical Professor at the Yale University School of Nursing serving as role model, mentor and researcher with many accomplished colleagues.
Dr. Wald has been a champion in the care for the dying patient. “From the nurse’s point of view, hospice care is the epitome of good nursing” says Dr. Wald. “It enables the patient to get through the end of life on their own terms. It is a holistic approach, looking at the patient as an individual, a human being. The spiritual role nurses play in the end of life process is essential to both patients and families” says Dr. Wald.

HPNA Distinguished Career Achievement Award

The HPNA Distinguished Career Achievement Award recognizes someone who has made a major contribution that advances the expert care of the seriously ill.

Eligibility
  • The recipient’s contribution may be in education, advocacy, leadership, clinical practice, and/or research. When given to a recipient whose primary contribution is in one domain, this award also recognizes that the recipient’s contributions may extend beyond that domain (for example, a researcher who is also an outstanding educator, or a clinician who has been an extraordinary advocate).
  • HPNA member (preferred).
  • Nurse (preferred).
  • The recipient’s contributions to the field should have national impact.
  • Selected by the HPNA Board of Directors.

Nominate Someone For This Award

Distinguished Career Achievement Award Recipients
2017 Kathie A. Kobler, MS, APN, PCNS-BC, CHPPN, FPCN

Ms. Kobler is currently the advance practice nurse leader of the perinatal and pediatric palliative care programs at Advocate Children’s Hospital, Park Ridge Illinois Campus. She has been caring for medically fragile and dying infants and children since 1985. Ms. Kobler speaks and writes professionally on perinatal/pediatric palliative care and bereavement issues, and is interested in investigating and identifying components of ritual most beneficial to bereaved parents. Her recent qualitative research study was to understand bereaved parents’ experience of a hospice memorial service, and to learn how ritual may address the personal suffering experienced by nurses caring for dying children.

Ms. Kobler works on a national level to promote the growth of perinatal and pediatric palliative care. She is co-author of the 2013 book, Meaningful Moments: Ritual and Reflection When a Child Dies.  She is also a national faculty member for RTS Bereavement Services, teaching perinatal and neonatal bereavement education, and has served as the president of the HPCC Board of Directors and as a co-chair of the National Pediatric Hospice and Palliative Care Collaborative. She hopes to continue contributing to the field through deepening her knowledge of nursing science, to engage in research and education, with a goal of improving care for children with serious illness and their familiesis Rose Virani is a senior research specialist in the Nursing Research and Education division at City of Hope in Duarte, CA. She has worked in various clinical and administrative areas in oncology nursing for 40 years.

2016 Rose Virani, MHA, RN, OCN, FPCN

Rose Virani is a senior research specialist in the Nursing Research and Education division at City of Hope in Duarte, CA. She has worked in various clinical and administrative areas in oncology nursing for 40 years.

Ms. Virani has served as project director on several national nursing education projects on end of life. She has been the project director of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) since the program’s inception in 2000. She is responsible for all ELNEC curricula, including Core, International, Pediatric Palliative Care, Critical Care, Geriatric, and APRN. She was a project director for the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI)–funded “Integrating Palliative Oncology Care into Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Education and Clinical Practice,” the Project on Death in America–funded “HOPE: Home Care Outreach for Palliative Care Education,” the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation–supported “Strengthening Nursing Education in End of Life Care,” and the Archstone Foundation–funded “Improving the Quality of Spiritual Care as a Dimension of Palliative Care.”

Ms. Virani was inducted as a fellow in HPNA in 2009 and is a Florence Wald Fellow. She has been a reviewer for the Hospice and Palliative Nursing Assistant Core Curriculum since 2002. She received the California “NurseWeek” Nursing Excellence Award for teaching in 2003, was the recipient in 2006 of both the Excellence in Supportive Care and the Mary Nowotny Excellence in Cancer Nursing Education awards from the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) in 2006, and later received the ONS Pearl Moore Making a Difference Award.

2015 Marcia Grant, DNSc, RN, FAAN

Marcia Grant is a distinguished professor of nursing research and education at City of Hope Medical Center. Dr. Grant served as the director of Nursing Research at the City of Hope until 2013. She has dedicated her career and research to enhancing symptom management and quality of life for patients and has had continuous funding from National Institute of Health (NIH) for over 25 years. Her projects have included pain management in elderly cancer patients; pain management at home; and pain education for nurse educators, and hospital and ambulatory care nurses.

Dr. Grant has focused her research on symptom management for colorectal cancer and hematopoietic cell transplant patients. She has over 200 publications in peer‐reviewed journals, including the American Journal of Nursing, Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, Oncology Nursing Forum, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Quality of Life Research, Seminars in Oncology Nursing, Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, and Supportive Care in Cancer.

Dr. Grant has received several national awards, including an elected fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Distinguished Researcher Award, ONS Excellence in Oncology Nursing Education Award, ONS Distinguished Award for Lifetime Achievement, and induction in the City of Hope Scientific Research Portrait Gallery Award.

2014 Judith A. Paice, PhD, RN, FAAN

The HPNA Distinguished Career Achievement award honors an individual who has made a major contribution in one or more of the areas of research and development, career path development, and education in palliative nursing. For the significant research she has conducted and the impact her work has had on the quality of life for individuals with chronic pain, her strong support of the research mission of HPNA, and her ongoing advocacy of the ELNEC curriculum, the 2014 recipient is Judith A. Paice, PhD, RN, FAAN.

Dr. Paice’s original consultancy on the ELNEC project fundamentally shaped the development of that curriculum and she continues to serve as an ELNEC faculty. She was one of the first scholars to discover that chronic opioid use could lead to hypogonadism, leading to better awareness of this adverse effect among care providers. Dr. Paice’s research into pain at end of life, including her work showing that topical morphine is not well-absorbed by intact skin, has changed palliative and end of life care for the better.

She is the Director of the Cancer Pain Program in the Division of Hematology-Oncology and a Research Professor of Medicine, at Northwestern University; Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Paice is also a full member of Northwestern University Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Paice has served as President of the American Pain Society and Secretary of the International Association for the Study of Pain. She travels internationally to educate health care professionals regarding cancer pain relief and palliative care. Dr. Paice serves as Associate Editor of the Journal of Pain, serves on the editorial board of the Clinical Journal of Pain and the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, and is the author of more than 150 scientific manuscripts. She also continues her work as a faculty member in the ELNEC program.

2013 Patricia Berry, PhD, RN, ACHPN®, FAAN, FPCN

Dr. Berry is Associate Professor of Education and Practice at the University of Utah and serves as Associate Director of the Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence. Her scholarly works have focused on pain and symptom management, palliative and end of life care, especially the institutionalized elderly. She has published numerous articles in peer reviewed journals and co-authored the book entitled: End of Life care: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Advance Practice Nurses. This book was selected as an American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year in 2003.

Dr. Berry also coordinated the project that produced the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations pain assessment and management standards. As a member of the National Board for Certification of Hospice and Palliative Nurses (NBCHPN®), Dr. Berry was involved in the development of the hospice and palliative advanced practice nursing certification examination and renewal process. She served as member and as Chair of NBCHPN®‘s Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Exam Development Committee. Currently there are over 760 nurses with this credential Advanced Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse (ACHPN®).

Dr. Berry was inducted as a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing in 2009 and as a Fellow in Palliative Care Nursing by the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association in 2012.

2012 Judy Lentz, RN, MSN, NHA

As CEO for HPNA, the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation (HPNF) and the National Board for Certification of Hospice and Palliative Nurses (NBCHPN®) for over 13 years, Judy Lentz facilitated the growth of all three organizations, which simultaneously has increased their recognition in this specialty field and in nursing. Past awards received include the Distinguished Service Award from Sewickley Valley Hospital, Sewickley, Pennsylvania; the Pathfinder in Palliative Care Award Winner from the American Cancer Society in October, 2011 and the President’s Citation from the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine on March 9, 2012.

A diploma graduate of Presbyterian-University Hospital in Pittsburgh who completed her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Pennsylvania State University, Ms. Lentz then obtained her Master’s Degree in Nursing as an oncology clinical nurse specialist from the University of Pittsburgh. Responsibility of initiating a subacute unit led her to become a licensed nursing home administrator. Over her nearly 50 year career in nursing and leadership, Ms. Lentz has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals, presented locally and nationally and has been a prolific advocate for nursing and the palliative care specialty.

2011 Patricia Murphy, PhD, APN, FAAN

Dr. Patricia Murphy heads the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–University Hospital’s (UMDNJ) interdisciplinary End-of-Life Consultation Service. Murphy started the service in 1999. Prior to coming to UMDNJ, she worked at Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark as a Clinical Specialist in Bereavement and Ethics and also served for many years as the chair of the Ethics Committee.

Dr. Murphy’s End-of-Life Consultation Service is unlike many hospital palliative care services in that it embraces a broad range of services from middle-of- the-night acute bereavement support to complex ethics consultations regarding treatment decisions for patients who may have no burdensome symptoms. Other members of the End-of-Life Consultation Service include a minister; two Masters prepared death and dying counselors, an ethicist, a surgeon and an oncologist participate on an as-needed basis. Murphy sees patients and their families every day concerning pain, grief and ethical questions.

She is also currently the chair of the New Jersey Board of Nursing Practice Committee and member of the New Jersey Board of Nursing Education Committee. She has published extensively on bereavement and ethical issues, with a particular focus on end-of-life care.

2010 June Lunney, PhD, RN

Dr. Lunney retired as the Associate Dean for Research at the West Virginia University School of Nursing in 2008. She received a Bachelor’s degree in nursing from Villanova University and a Master’s degree and PhD from the University of Maryland at Baltimore.

From 1991 until 1999, Dr. Lunney served as an extramural program director at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), during which time she helped develop NIH support for research on end-of-life issues. She subsequently worked at the Center for End-Of-Life Care at the RAND Corporation, where she was a major contributor to a study on the costs and use of care at the end-of-life.

She was also the lead author on the 2003 Institute of Medicine’s report titled, “Describing Death in America”. In 2004, Dr. Lunney chaired the Planning Committee for the NIH State of the Science Conference “Improving End-Of-Life Care” and served as chair of the 2009 AAHPM/HPNA Conference Scientific Planning Team. Her current research, “Describing Trajectories of Dying”, focuses on functional decline at the end-of-life. In January of 2010, Dr. Lunney became HPNA’s Director of Research.

2009 Barbara Daly, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dr. Daly is a Gertrude Perkins Oliva Professor in Oncology Nursing at Case Western Reserve University and holds the position of Clinical Ethics Director with University Hospitals of Cleveland. Her work and research, for which she has gained international recognition, has focused on numerous end-of-life issues, including long-term ventilation, care giving in chronic illness, health care outcomes and costs, and disease management of the chronically ill. She has contributed to numerous books and publications. Dr. Daly’s current projects include a federally funded study from National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) examining “Multiple Morbidities in Vulnerable Populations: Nurse Scientist Training”. She is also serving as co-investigator for a research project titled “Center for Excellence to Build the Science of Self-Management: A Systems Approach” and principal investigator for the “Improving the Quality of Advanced Cancer Care with Disease Management” research initiative.

Dr. Daly is committed to the development and advancement of palliative and end of life care. To that end, she has served as Chair of the Task Force on Code of Ethics of the American Nurses Association and Vice-Chair of the Advisory Board of the Volunteer Guardianship Program/Adult Guardianship Program. She has won several awards, including the Grenvik Family Ethics Award from the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the Sigma Theta Tau Daniel Pesuit “Spirit of Renewal” Award, and the Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher from NINR/NIH. Dr. Daly is also a frequent guest speaker for talks on end-of-life care, particularly as it applies to ethics and end of life decision making.

2008 Elizabeth (Betty) Davies, RN, PhD, FAAN

Dr. Elizabeth (Betty) Davies is the current Professor and Chair of the Department of Family Health Care Nursing at the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing. Dr. Davies has focused her research on the care of families with life-threatening illnesses and bereavement in families, especially in siblings following death from cancer. She has written numerous publications including “Fading Away: The experience of transition in families with terminal illness” and “Shadows in the Sun: Experiences of sibling bereavement in childhood”.

Currently her work funded by NINR is examining Chinese and Latino families in pediatric palliative care. She is also studying fatigue in children with cancer.

Dr. Davies has committed to developing pediatric palliative care. With this goal in mind, Dr. Davies has been involved in numerous projects pertaining to pediatric palliative care including serving on the advisory board of the Pediatric ELNEC. She is also vice-president of the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement. She has received numerous honors and awards in the US and Canada and is widely published.

2007 Elizabeth Ford Pitorak, MSN, CNS

Elizabeth Pitorak is the Director of the Hospice Institute at the Hospice of the Western Reserve, Cleveland, Ohio, Adjunct Field Instructor at the Mandel School of Applied Sciences, Clinical Instructor Biomedical Ethics at Case Western Reserve University, Clinical Associate in The Breen School of Nursing at Ursuline College and Facilitator of the Safe Conduct Team at the Ireland Cancer Center. Ms. Pitorak is a Founder of the Hospice of Western Reserve and served in multiple positions on a voluntary basis for many years prior to her employment with them. With over 25 years as an educator, Ms. Pitorak has initiated specialized programs in hospice, published manuscripts and chapters, presented and taught nationally and internationally, served as project director for research initiatives and has been acknowledged with many awards. Her service also extends to numerous professional organizations, both local and national, many for whom, like HPNA, where she served as a Past President of the Board of Directors. She is the current President of the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation.

2005 Nessa Coyle, PhD, NP, APRN, BC-PCM, FAAN

The HPNA Distinguished Career Achievement Award is an honorary award given to someone who has made a major contribution in the area of research and development, career, and/or education in hospice and palliative nursing. Nessa Coyle PhD, NP, APRN, BC-PCM, FAAN will be honored as the second recipient of this award.

Born in London, England Nessa moved to New York City in the late 1960’s and began her work at Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Her interest in neurological nursing exposed her to cancer patients in pain and the effects of poorly controlled pain on the patient, family and staff. After taking a years’ leave of absence to complete a Master of Science/nurse practitioner program at Columbia University, she returned to Sloan-Kettering, and with Dr Kathleen Foley, chief of the Pain and Palliative Care Service, developed a Supportive Care Program. Nessa has been Director of the Program since it’s inception in 1981.

Nessa is well published in pain and palliative care, co-edited the Textbook of Palliative Nursing with Dr Betty Ferrell, is a member of several editorial boards, and is an active board member of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York Hospice Program. She has lectured extensively on pain and palliative care as well as ethical issues for nurses, and was a consultant for the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law, Committee on Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.

A recipient of many awards, Nessa was elected as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing in 1997, and completed her PhD in nursing at New York University in 2002.

2004 Betty Ferrell, PhD, FAAN

Dr. Betty Ferrell has been in oncology nursing for 26 years and has focused her clinical expertise and research in pain management, quality of life, and end of life care. Dr. Ferrell is a Research Scientist at the City of Hope National Medical Center. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and she has over 250 publications in peer-reviewed journals and texts. Dr. Ferrell received the Oncology Nursing Society Distinguished Nurse Researcher Award in 1996. She is Principal Investigator of a study funded by the American Cancer Society on “Palliative Surgery” and she is also Principal Investigator of the End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) project funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and several other funded projects related to end of life care in cancer centers and QOL issues in cancer survivors. She is a hospice volunteer and also the chairperson of the Southern California Cancer Pain Initiative. She has authored four books – Cancer Pain Management (1995), a text on Suffering (1995), Pain in the Elderly (1996) and the Textbook of Palliative Nursing Care (2001).

HPNA Distinguished Nursing Practice Award

The Ruby Jones Nursing Hero Award, initiated in 2008, became the HPNA Distinguished Nursing Practice Award in 2015.  The previous award honored Ruby Jones,  an HPNA member living in New Orleans, Louisiana, who was named by Newsweek in 2006 as a “hero” for the work she did during the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

Award Criteria

The HPNA Distinguished Nursing Practice Award recognizes a nurse who has long provided care for individuals with serious illness and their families in a manner that has clearly gone well beyond the ‘usual and expected’ requirements. The award recognizes a nurse whose clinical practice is exemplary and who is generous in mentoring other clinicians. The inaugural award was presented in 2015. The recipient is chosen by the HPNA Board of Directors.

Eligibility
  • HPNA member.
  • As a reflection of the HPNA membership, the recipient may be any of the following: APRN, RN, LPN/LVN, or CNA.
  • The scope of the contributions that the recipient has made should extend beyond that of a single organization or agency.
  • Actively involved in the care of persons with serious illness and their families for a minimum of 10 years (preferred).
  • Selected by the HPNA Board of Directors

Nominate Someone For This Award

Distinguished Nursing Practice Award Recipients
2017 Lolita Melhado,PhD, ARNP, FNP, BC

Dr. Melhado has been in nursing for nearly 25 years, and has focused her clinical expertise and research in areas of moral distress and moral courage in oncology nurses, palliative care, and end of life care. She is a nurse practitioner on the Palliative Care Team at Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, Florida, and is the co-chair of the hospital’s Ethics Consult Group.

She served on the strategic planning committee and was involved in the startup of the palliative care program at Lee Memorial Health System, and is the founder and former president of the Southwest Florida Hospice and Palliative Nurses Chapter. Dr. Melhado serves on the Advance Directive National Work Group, and previously served as a PhD student representative on the HPNA Research Advisory Council. As an educational consultant, she served on the online education and curriculum development committee for the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC), and was recently appointed as co-chair of the HPNA APRN special interest group.

Dr. Melhado has presented several topics in palliative care on both the regional and national levels, and is a guest lecturer with nurse practitioner students at Florida Gulf Coast University on topics in palliative care. She is the co-principal investigator and co-author of evaluating nurses’ perceptions of end of live care and co-developer of Perception of End of Life Care evidence based tool.

2016 Maureen Lynch, MS, ANP-BC, AOCN, ACHPN, FPCN

Maureen Lynch has an extensive clinical background in oncology and palliative nursing, has written numerous articles, and has presented both nationally and locally. She initiated the Pain and Symptom Clinic, which preceded the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DCFI) Palliative Care Service in Boston, MA. For the last 16 years she has worked in the outpatient palliative care program at DFCI in Boston. She developed the Palliative Nursing Fellowship at DFCI/Brigham and Women’s Health Cancer Center (BWH), serves on national faculty for ELNEC, and is co-director of the Art & Science of Palliative Nursing course at Harvard Medical School.

Throughout her career, Ms. Lynch has contributed to the development of the inpatient consult service, the palliative care unit, and, more extensively, the outpatient oncology palliative care clinic. Recent projects have included coediting and authoring for the HPNA Core Curriculum for Advanced Practice Hospice and Palliative Registered Nurse, serving as faculty for Oncology Nursing Society regional pain and education projects, and developing a communication educational module for oncology nurses.

Ms. Lynch is a former member of the HPNA Board of Directors. She served on the APN Mentoring Program Committee in 2009, the Board Leadership and Development Committee in 2009 and 2010, and the Palliative Nursing Leadership Institute Task Force in 2012. She was a member of the national faculty for the HPNA ELNEC Core course from 2008 to 2015 and, since 2014, has been on the national faculty for the HPNA Advance Practice Certification Review Course.

2015 Kate Ford Roberts, MA, BSN, RN, CHPN

Kate Ford Roberts is Clinical Nurse Specialist in Palliative Care at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics. She has dedicated her professional life to caring for seriously ill individuals and their families near the end of life. She is the inaugural recipient of this honorary award given by the HPNA Board of Directors to an individual who has made a major contribution in the area of palliative nursing clinical practice.

In 1978, as a new graduate nurse, she became one of the founding members of HospiceCare, Inc., now Agrace HospiceCare, in Madison, WI. In those early years she worked full-time nights and volunteered her time at the hospice during the day. In 1986 she became involved in the Wisconsin Cancer Pain Initiative, and in 1994 she became an educator for the Cancer Pain Role Model Program. In 1991 she started the Center for Life and Loss Integration, a grief counseling center, and co-founded Pathways Through Grief, an aftercare/bereavement program for Gunderson Funeral Homes in Madison, WI.

In 1999 Ms. Roberts was involved in the initial development of the University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics Palliative Care Program, where she remains an integral member of the Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Team. Her colleagues describe her as the “heart of the palliative care team.” In 2011 Ms. Roberts received Agrace HospiceCare’s Excellence in End-of-Life Care Award.

Past Ruby Jones Nursing Hero Award Recipients
2011 Carma Erickson-Hurt, MSN APRN ACHPN® LCDR USN RET

Carma Erickson-Hurt, a long standing member of HPNA, volunteered in Haiti to help with the recovery efforts after its devastating earthquake in 2009. Carma, who teaches health assessment classes at the Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, Arizona, volunteered for a 3 month rotation as the Chief Nursing Officer for Project HOPE. Three years ago she retired from the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps after serving for 20 years.

Carma first worked with Project HOPE when stationed on board the USNS Comfort in response to the Tsunami disaster in 2005. During 2010, Ms. Erickson-Hurt served as the HOPE Medical Director onboard the USS Iwo Jima and ashore in Nicaragua and Panama.

2010 Natalie Casey, RN

Mrs. Casey is being recognized for her 61 years of work as registered nurse, including spending the last 42 years of her long career at UPMC Passavant. Until suffering from cardiac arrest this past February, Natalie, 83, worked a six-hour shift, five days a week at the hospital, sitting with patients and helping them with whatever they needed. Much of her time was spent in conversation with patients, which she believes is a critical part of nursing.

After graduating from Allegheny High School on Pittsburgh’s North Side in 1945, Natalie joined the Cadet Nurse Corps, part of the homeland World War II effort. She went on to train at St. John’s Hospital in Pittsburgh where is became a registered nurse. Natalie worked for a short time at Bellevue Suburban and St. Clair Hospitals, both local community hospitals, before finally arriving at UPMC – Passavant in 1967.

With decades of nursing experience and personal attentiveness to her patients, Mrs. Casey has found that the greatest medicine doesn’t come from a pill or a bottle. “I found out that if I took a genuine interest in my patients, it took their minds off what they were in the hospital for,” she says. “Nursing isn’t just delivering medicine and changing bandages. If you listen to somebody, it’s surprising how much their outlook can change.”

2009 Sandra Clarke, RN

Ms. Clarke is being recognized for her work as the founder of the “No One Dies Alone” (NODA) program, which provides a reassuring presence of a volunteer companion to dying patients who would otherwise be alone. NODA encourages hospital employees to participate as “compassionate companions” for “elder orphans”. These companions read, sign, play music, provide a quiet vigil or hold a patient’s hand when family members cannot be present.

Established in November of 2001, NODA is an all-volunteer program and operates with only a small grant to subsidize the printing of program materials. The written NODA manual, which was authored by Sandra Clark, has been distributed to more than 400 hospitals, hospices, and AIDS care facilities worldwide.

Ms. Clark first developed the “No One Dies Alone” program after attending to a dying patient who was alone and without family present. After the passing of this particular patient, Sandra envisioned her idea for putting together a group of volunteers made up of hospital employees who would be willing to sit with the alone and dying. During the next 16 years, Sandra’s idea for the NODA program did not move beyond casual conversations and meetings. It was not until a hospital employee overheard Sandra’s idea and presented her program to hospital administration for consideration. In only six months time, the “No One Dies Alone” program was created based on a simple plan without creating a new department and with only minimal financial impact.

Ms. Clarke works at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Eugene, Oregon. Her Final Farewell program was also featured in the May 2008 issue of “O” Magazine with an article titled, “The Kindness of Strangers.”

2008 LuJan Meketi, RN

LuJan has established a new program that honors nurses who have died. The program is called the Final Farewell and is fashioned after the special funeral services provided for firefighters, police, etc. As LuJan has stated “Who better deserves a Final Farewell than a nurse – one who dedicated her or his own life to taking care of others.” The program has two parts:

Part I: Easing the family’s pain– by providing services, carrying out requests of the dying nurse prior to death, donating to a local college nursing scholarship. A white flag with a red cross and the nurse’s name embroidered on it is placed at the head of the casket. Honorary pallbearers attend the visitation and funeral services and wear traditional white nursing uniforms and the familiar blue and red capes. They enter the chapel in single file with the left wing of their capes folded back showing their nametags with a black ribbon attached. During the services, one of the pallbearers addresses the congregation and shares memories of the nurse’s time on duty.

Part II: Saying good-bye: the honorary pallbearers stand watch as the casket is put into the hearse. At the grave site, a Nightingale lamp is lit in the nurse’s honor. After the chaplain’s prayers, the nurse’s name is requested to report to duty. When there is no response, the nurse’s name and license number are called out twice more with the same request. After the third and final call, the nurse’s license number is announced as being retired and the lamp’s flame is extinguished. The white flag with the red cross is folded and presented to the family as a token of appreciation for the nurse’s devotion to the profession. The left wings of the pallbearers’ capes are then draped forward covering their nametags as they walk silently away from the grave site.  

HPNA Distinguished Nursing Researcher Award

The HPNA Distinguished Nursing Researcher Award recognizes a nurse researcher who has demonstrated longevity and consistency in research that advances the mission and vision of HPNA through conducting high quality research and research presentations and publications in peer-reviewed journals.

Eligibility
  • Demonstrated leadership as the principle investigator on multiple research studies focused on advancing expert care in serious illness.
  • Served as a mentor in research for nurses and/or nursing students.
  • Published research which is used and cited by others.
  • HPNA member (preferred).
  • Nurse (preferred).
  • Research career that spans a minimum of 10 years (preferred).
  • The HPNA Research Advisory Council will make recommendations to the HPNA Board of Directors for approval.

Nominate Someone For This Award

Distinguished Nursing Researcher Award Recipients
2017 Sally A. Norton, PhD, RN, FNAP, FPCN, FAAN

Dr. Norton is a tenured Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of Rochester and holds the inaugural Independence Chair in Nursing and Palliative Care. She serves as a co-director of research for the Division of Palliative Care in the Department of Medicine and holds a secondary appointment in the School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Dr. Norton is dedicated to improving the care of patients with advanced illness. Her well-established program of research is focused on palliative care and end of life decision making, with emphases on the communication processes and practice patterns of care delivery in the acute and long-term care settings. A nationally recognized expert in palliative care research and qualitative and mixed method research designs, she has worked successfully across professions to improve communication and understanding surrounding systems of palliative care and hospice delivery, and to pinpoint the approaches most meaningful to patients and families that lead to the highest quality outcomes.

Dr. Norton is a fellow of the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association and the American Academy of Nursing, and has represented HPNA on several national quality-related task forces. She was a member and former chair of the HPNA research special interest group, and is co-chairing Measuring What Matters, a national task force that is a joint initiative of HPNA and AAHPM.

2016 Marie Bakitas, DNSc, CRNP, ACHPN, AOCH, FAAN

Marie Bakitas is an internationally recognized expert in palliative care, with a focus on reducing suffering and enhancing quality of life for persons with advanced illness and family caregivers,
especially in rural areas. Her early telehealth palliative care model ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) has led to practice and policy changes.

She has participated in 27 funded research grants, served as principal investigator on 12 grants, and currently has R01 funding from the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). Dr. Bakitas has received awards from the Oncology Nursing Society, the Council on the Advancement of Nursing Science, and The Cancer and Leukemia Group B, among others, and has served on
more than 10 national committees and advisory boards.

Dr. Bakitas won a 2015 AAHPM & HPNA Annual Assembly Outstanding Research Abstract Award and the 2003 HPNA Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse of the Year Award. She served on the Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing editorial board, was an HPNA research member for the Measuring What Matters project, and is an HPNA Annual Assembly Abstract Reviewer.

Before her current position at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, she served as an associate professor in the Department of Medicine, Section of Palliative Medicine at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, and in The Dartmouth Institute of Health Policy and Clinical Practice. She also served as a visiting scholar at Boston College School of Nursing and as a clinical professor at Yale University School of Nursing.

Dr. Bakitas is also the winner of the 2016 Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation Project on Death in America Nursing Leadership Award in Palliative care.

2015 Keela Herr, PhD, RN

Keela Herr is professor, associate dean for faculty, and co-director of the Iowa John A. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence at the University of Iowa. Dr. Herr is the 2015 recipient of the HPNA Distinguished Researcher Award. The HPNA Board of Directors bestows this award to an individual who has made a major contribution in the area of palliative nursing research.

For more than 25 years, Dr. Herr has been engaged in a program of research, scholarly, and professional activities focused on the problem of pain in older adults, with emphases in assessment strategies, improving practices through translational research, and improving quality at end of life. Her research has supported advances in pain assessment and strategies for improving pain management across care settings. She has been the recipient of research funding from NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), National Cancer Institute, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Mayday Funds. She has most recently served as the Co-Chairperson of the Clinical User Panel of the AAHPM and HPNA “Measuring What Matters” quality initiative.

Dr. Herr has served on the board of directors for the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), American Pain Society, and American Society for Pain Management Nursing and as expert panel member on guideline development for pain in older adults by AGS. Dr. Herr is inducted as a Fellow in AGS and the American Academy of Nursing.

2014 Judith Gedney Baggs, PhD, RN, FAAN

Judith Baggs is currently the Elizabeth N. Gray Distinguished Professor at Oregon Health & Science School of Nursing. She formerly served as the Senior Associate Dean for Academics at OHSU School of Nursing. For nine years she was the editor of Research in Nursing & Health, a premier general nursing research journal. A member of the American Academy of Nursing since 2002, she served on the Expert Panel on End of Life and Palliative Care, before assuming her current role on the national Board of Directors.

Dr. Baggs’ research has focused on intensive care units, interprofessional collaboration between nurses and physicians, and ethical and end-of-life decision-making. She has received funding the National Institute of Health. She has published over 50 publications and presents her research both nationally and internationally. Dr. Baggs serves as a consultant and mentor to numerous students, faculty and clinicians.

2013 Susan C. McMillan, PhD, ARNP, FAAN

Dr. McMillan is Distinguished University Health Professor, at the University of South Florida, College of Nursing and the Center for Hospice Palliative Care, and End of Life Studies at USF. Dr. McMillan founded the Center for Hospice Palliative Care and End of Life Studies at USF as a research interest group in 1996. The Center’s monthly meetings offer research support for doctoral students and faculty.

Dr. McMillan is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. She has received numerous awards including the Distinguished Nurse Researcher Award given by Southern Nursing Research Society and the Award for Consistency and Excellence of Contributions to the Oncology Nursing Literature, by the Oncology Nursing Society. Dr. McMillan has published a multitude of papers in refereed journals that report her work focused on symptom management and quality of life of patients and caregivers. As a member of the HPNA Research Committee she contributed to development of the first HPNA Research Agenda 2009-2012.

2012 Kathleen Puntillo, RN, DNSc, FAAN

Dr. Puntillo is Professor Emeritus and Research Scientist at the University of California, San Francisco. She has a long-standing program of research on pain in critically ill and injured patients and has been funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, and several other professional organizations. She has published extensively on topics that include pain in the critically ill; procedural pain; ICU symptom assessment and management; and ICU palliative care. She was lead investigator for the Thunder Project II on procedural pain funded by the Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

Her current research includes an National Institute of Health (NIH) funded randomized clinical trial of an intervention for thirst in ICU patients, and she is leading an international study of procedural pain in ICU patients. Dr. Puntillo is also an educator and consultant in palliative care. She completed the first Harvard Program on Palliative Care Education in 2000; was one of two nurse members of a Robert Wood Johnson-funded ICU Peer Workgroup on End-of-Life; and was a Soros, Project on Death in America, Faculty Scholar.

She and a physician colleague conduct communication workshops for ICU nurses practicing in Veteran’s Administration hospitals in the greater New York City Area and elsewhere. Dr. Puntillo is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and maintains her clinical practice in critical care nursing. She will receive the Marguerite Kinney Distinguished Research Career Award from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses in May of 2012.

2011 Neville E. Strumpf, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dr. Strumpf received her BS from the State University of New York, her MS from Russell Sage College, and her PhD from New York University. She has advanced research, education, and practice in gerontological care by focusing on the vexing clinical problems of frail elders and testing interventions aimed at improving outcomes of care. Her program of research focuses on individualized care for frail older adults, regardless of setting or circumstance. Several interrelated lines of inquiry have evolved as a result of this focus, including restraint-free care, quality of life for older cancer patients, access to services for refugee elders, end-of-life care in nursing homes, and prevention of falls.

Her work in end-of-life care began with a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWF) funded study to introduce a model of palliative care in nursing homes. The work identified the essential components for nursing home residents related to advance care planning, symptom management, and psychosocial support, and demonstrated that with adequate staff training and administrative buy-in, such a model was feasible, lessening hospital transfers at the end of life, and assuring that the wishes of residents and families were honored at the end of life. Several publications emerged from the work, including an explanation of the model, staff attitudes, and feeding decisions.

Dr. Strumpf considers palliative care to be a natural outgrowth of her previous research which emphasized individualized care—early on, she was struck by the number of nursing home residents and hospital patients who died while physically restrained. Her most recent article appeared in a special issue of Nursing Clinics of North America devoted to palliative care, a paper on “Living with Cancer,” which was written with her partner, Dr. Karen Buhler-Wilkerson, just prior to her death from ovarian cancer.

2010 Betty Ferrell, RN, PhD, FAAN, FPCN

Dr. Ferrell received a BSN from Central State University in Edmond, Oklahoma. She then earned a Masters in Nursing from the University of Oklahoma and a PhD in Nursing from Texas Women’s University in Denton, Texas. In 2008, Dr. Ferrell completed a second Master’s degree in Theology from Claremont Graduate University.

Dr. Betty Ferrell has conducted research in oncology for 32 years and has focused her clinical expertise and research in the areas of pain management, quality of life, and palliative care. Dr. Ferrell is a Research Scientist at the City of Hope National Medical Center and Principal Investigator of the End of Life Nursing Education (ELNEC) Project. Dr. Ferrell has obtained Fellow status with both the American Academy of Nursing as well as the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association. She is also Chair of the National Consensus Project (NCP).

Dr. Ferrell received the Oncology Nursing Society Distinguished Nurse Researcher Award in 1996. Dr. Ferrell chaired the National Consensus Project (NCP) for 7 years, producing the “Clinical Practice Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care” and overseeing the revisions of the 2nd Edition. In 2009 Dr. Ferrell partnered with Dr. Christine Pulchaski to create the “Improving the Quality of Spiritual Care as a Dimension of Palliative Care Project.

Dr. Ferrell has authored five books, including Cancer Pain Management (1995), a text on Suffering (1995), Pain in the Elderly (1996) and the Textbook of Palliative Nursing Care (2001) and the Textbook of Palliative Nursing Care, 2nd Edition (2001, 2010) published by Oxford University Press. Dr. Ferrell also has over 300 publications in peer-reviewed journals and texts. In January 2010, Dr. Ferrell became the Editor-In-Chief of the Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing.

2009 Mary Ersek, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dr. Ersek has developed and led numerous research initiatives, including a program of research on pain and palliative care in older adults with an emphasis on residents of nursing homes. This particular study included two NIH-funded randomized controlled trials, one investigating the efficacy of a pain self management group for residents of retirement communities, and a current project that examines the effectiveness of a pain management algorithm coupled with intensive support and consultation in enhancing the health status of nursing home residents. Another ongoing study, funded by the New York Department of Health, is testing the effectiveness of web-based informatics reports and education in changing clinical practice patterns and enhancing resident outcomes in nursing homes.

Dr. Ersek is currently an Associate Professor, Associate Director of the Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She is a manuscript reviewer for several journals, including the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Geriatric Nursing, Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, and Journal of Palliative Medicine and serves on the scientific review committee at the National Institutes of Health and National Palliative Care Research Center.

Dr. Ersek received her Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing from Georgetown University and a Masters of Nursing and PhD in Nursing Science from the University of Washington. She is a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing.

2008 Karin T. Kirchhoff, PhD, RN, FAAN

Karin T. Kirchhoff, PhD, RN, FAAN is Professor in the School of Nursing at University of Wisconsin. A well known figure in palliative care research and education, her work on evidence-based practice is cited frequently.

Dr. Kirchhoff’s career has focused on describing and testing interventions for the critically ill patient. A well recognized critical care nursing researcher through the ‘70s and ‘90s, Dr. Kirchhoff was struck by the profound differences in the way death occurred in hospice settings compared to the ICU. She began to explore what was known about end of life in the ICU, communicating and collaborating with experts in the field. She noted that terms for describing and identifying ICU end of life events re typically negative (for example, “withdraw life support”; “do not resuscitate”), leading her to ask, “Where are the positive interventions in ICU end of life?” Following this line of inquiry, her research portfolio quickly grew; and she has since published extensively in scholarly books and journals.

Dr. Kirchhoff has lead and collaborated on numerous research studies which, in addition to improving practice, have highlighted the important roles nurses play at end of life. Working in partnership with other palliative care professionals across the state of Wisconsin, she examined how a tailored patient-centered approach could affect the advance care planning process; this project illustrates her commitment to collaborative research relationships. Recently she performed a randomized control trial to test a structured advance care planning process with patients facing end stages of chronic disease.

Dr. Kirchhoff is well known for her ability to connect science to the bedside, making theory understandable and useable for nurses at all levels. She les an interdisclinary palliative care course at the University of Wisconsin and serves as role model and mentor for students. In her research studies, she provides opportunities for gruate students to particate in the process, allowing them to obtain superior training.

New Investigator Research Award

Award Criteria

The HPNA New Investigator Award recognizes the work of an individual in the beginning of his or her research career who has done quality research which can be a pilot or preliminary study that focused on clinical care, professional development, or advancement of palliative nursing.

Eligibility
  • Be an HPNA member.
  • Nurse.
  • Doctoral degree or finished post-doctoral studies within the past five years.
  • Has been the principle investigator for a study focused on clinical care, professional development, or the advancement of palliative nursing.
  • First author of a high quality research article.
  • Nominations will be screened by the HPNA Research Advisory Council who will make recommendations to the HPNA Board of Directors for approval.

Nominate Someone For This Award

 New Investigator (Research) Award Recipients
2017 J. Nicholas Dionne-Odom, PhD, RN, ACHPN

Dr. Dionne-Odom is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing in Birmingham, AL. In just three years since earning his PhD from Boston College, he has accumulated nearly 30 peer-reviewed publications, presented at more than 30 conferences, and received grants totaling over $1 million from the National Institutes of Nursing Research, National Cancer Institute, National Palliative Care Research Center, and the UAB Center for Palliative and Supportive Care. He is currently funded by a five year K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award from the National Institute of Nursing Research.

He has received numerous prestigious awards including UAB’s Most Esteemed Postdoc of the Year, UAB’s John R. Durant Award for Excellence in Cancer Research, and the Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing Distinguished Dissertation Award.  Dr. Dionne-Odom was the lead author of the randomized trial outcomes of an early palliative care support intervention for advanced cancer family caregivers called ENABLE, published in 2015 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the demonstrated the profound positive impact that early palliative care can have on family caregivers.  The study was cited by the American Society of Clinical Oncology as one of 2015’s top advances in clinical cancer research. Dr. Dionne-Odom has been the co-lead for the last three years at the annual State of the Science Plenary Session for the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly.

2015 Lisa Lindley, PhD, RN

Lisa Lindley is an Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee College of Nursing. Dr. Lindley’s education includes a BSN from St. Catherine’s University, an MBA from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and a PhD in Nursing from the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill School of Nursing. She is the 2015 recipient of the HPNA New Investigator Award.

As a health services and policy researcher, Dr. Lindley’s research focuses on access, cost, and quality of pediatric hospice care. She was recently awarded a Mentored Research Scientist Development Award (K01) from NINR for the study, An Examination of Hospice Use Among Children. In addition, she received federal funding during her doctoral program from NINR (T32) and AHRQ (R36).

Dr. Lindley has authored and coauthored more than 20 pediatric hospice care studies published in peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management and American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. She is a reviewer for the Journal of International and Interdisciplinary Business Research, Nursing Economic$, and Health Care Management Review. Dr. Lindley serves on several national and local hospice and palliative care committees that advance nursing research and practice.

2014 Lynn Reinke, PhD, ANRP

The HPNA New Investigator Award recognizes an HPNA nurse at the beginning of a research career who has performed superior research focused on clinical care, professional development, or the advancement of hospice and palliative nursing. For her research focusing on the delivery of end-of-life care for patients with advanced, life-limiting illnesses, particularly COPD and lung cancer, her experience and initiative recruiting patients for clinical trials and observational studies, and her recent completion of an NRI-funded pilot study assessing the palliative care needs of Veterans newly diagnosed with lung cancer, the 2014 recipient is Lynn Reinke, PhD, ANRP.

Dr. Reinke is a clinical assistant professor in the School of Nursing’s department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems at the University of Washington. She is a Principal Investigator in Health Services Research and Development in the department of VA Puget Sound Health Care System. Her research focuses on the capacity of the VA to meet the needs of veterans recently diagnosed with lung cancer. While identifying several unmet physical and psychosocial needs of these patients, her recent work has also unmasked a need to integrate outpatient palliative care services for these veterans and their informal caregivers.

2012 Karen Kehl, PhD RN ACHPN FPCN

Dr. Kehl has held positions in palliative care and hospices since 1989. She was the 2009 recipient of the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Foundation Certification Grant, a College of Palliative Care Research Scholar in 2008-2009 and received recognition as a KL2 Scholar, Clinical and Translational Science Award at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Additionally, as an HPNA member volunteer, Dr. Kehl is a current reviewer for the Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing (JHPN) and the Journal of Palliative Medicine (JPM) journals and serves as a member of the Scientific Sub-committee for the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly (2007-2011).

Additionally, Dr. Kehl has received funding from the National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health from 2007-2011. Dr. Kehl’s many years of experience as both a clinician and an educator are generating new and exciting research ideas in the field of hospice and palliative nursing care. Dr. Kehl is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing in Madison, Wisconsin.

2011 Terrah L. Foster, PhD RN CPNP

Terrah L. Foster, PhD RN CPNP, is an Assistant Professor at the Vanderbilt University (VU) School of Nursing in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Foster completed her Bachelor of Science at Jacksonville State University (1999) and her Master of Science in Nursing at VU (2001). After gaining several years of experience as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, she continued her education and completed her PhD in Nursing Science at VU (2008).

Her research interests include pediatric palliative care, particularly legacy-making and continuing bonds in children living with life-threatening conditions and their families. Dr. Foster has published her work in Death Studies, Journal of Palliative and Supportive Care, Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, Journal of Palliative Nursing, and Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. She has been recognized for her scholarly activities with several awards such as the International Palliative Medicine Symposium Outstanding Poster Award and the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association Outstanding Research Abstract Award. She was named a College of Palliative Care Research Scholar by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Dr. Foster is also actively involved in her community, serving as a volunteer with international medical organizations to assist underserved children and families.

2010 Maryjo Prince-Paul, PhD, APRN, ACHPN®

Dr. Prince-Paul is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute Prevention Research Education Post-Doctoral Training Program (PREP) position, considered to be a highly competitive position that speaks to her commitment to a research career. Extending her research beyond the postdoctoral dissertation, Dr. Prince Paul was recently awarded a grant from the Fetzer Institute as co-investigator on a study of “The Role of Forgiveness in End-of-Life Care and Bereavement”.

Dr. Prince-Paul’s education includes Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in nursing from Wright State University and Case Western Reserve University, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve University and Research Assistant at the Hospice Institute, Hospice of the Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio.

With 7 publications in peer reviewed journals, Dr. Prince-Paul recently co-authored a chapter in the Textbook of Palliative Care, 3rd Ed., Oxford University Press (2010). She has an extensive record of presentations at national conferences and co-chaired both the 2008 and the 2009 AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly.

2009 Anne M. Hughes, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dr. Hughes’s research, “Meaning and Experiences of Dignity to Urban Poor With Advanced Cancer”, is a focus on dignity in the urban poor with advanced disease. Currently, she is an advanced practice nurse in palliative care at Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center and an Associate Clinical Professor in Nursing in the Department of Physiological Nursing at University of California San Francisco.

A 2007 graduate of the University of California San Francisco, Dr. Hughes received the 2008 Oncology Nursing Society Excellence in Cancer Nursing Research Award as well as the University California San Francisco Distinguished Dissertation of the Year for 2007.

2007 Garrett Chan, PhD, APRN, BC-PCM, CEN

Dr. Chan is Assistant Clinical Professor and faculty in the Critical Care/Trauma Graduate Program at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing.

His doctoral dissertation examined an area of end of life care often overlooked: the experiences of critically and terminally ill patients, their family members, and health care professionals in emergency department situations. His work has led to a greater understanding of how palliative care may be integrated into emergency nursing and medicine practices.

Dr. Chan has received funding for his research from the Emergency Nurses Association Foundation and Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Eta Chapter. He has published his research in Academic Emergency Medicine and Nursing Philosophy, with other articles under review in the Journal of Palliative Medicine and American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. At UCSF, he teaches classes which help prepare future advanced practice nurses. He received his PhD in Nursing from UCSF in 2005.

2006 Amy O. Calvin, PhD, RN

Amy Calvin, PhD, RN, is the first winner of this award. Dr. Calvin has served as the Palliative Care Nurse Researcher at St Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, Texas as an assistant professor in the Department of Acute and Continuing Care at the University Of Texas School Of Nursing at Houston. She collaborated with Dr. Porter Storey to write the protocol for the Use of Oxycodone Hydrochloride for Dyspnea In Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and recently conducted a study titled “The Neuroscience Nurse’s Experience With End-of-Life Care.” She is currently leading the Palliative Care Team’s study entitled “Use of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale by Patients Admitted to an Acute Palliative Care Service.”

Presidential Citation Award

The Presidential Citation Award is strategically awarded to an individual who has made a significant impact on national policy and/or regulations that affect hospice and palliative care.  Nominees can come from various backgrounds, including but not limited to members of the media, legislators, community activists, and educators.

Eligibility
  • Nominations for this award are made by the HPNA Board of Directors.
  • The recipient may or may not be a nurse and is typically someone from outside the hospice and palliative care field.

 

Presidential Citation Award Recipients
2017 The Honorable Joseph R. Biden, former Vice President of the United States

Joseph R. Biden has shown has shown tremendous leadership in the battle against cancer by spearheading the Cancer Moonshot program within the federal government. The program, announced by President Barack Obama during his 2016 State of the Union Address, called on Vice President Biden to “lead a new, national Cancer Moonshot, focused on making a decade of progress in preventing, diagnosing, and treating cancer in five years, ultimately striving to end cancer as we know it.” The program directs the federal government to achieve the mission through a focused effort to leverage federal investments, targeted incentives, private sector efforts, and patient initiatives.

Joseph Biden has been involved in the federal government since 1973, first serving as a United States senator from Delaware, and then as Vice President from 2008 to 2016.

2016 Sylvia M. Burwell, US Secretary of Health and Human Services

Sylvia Burwell was sworn in as the 22nd U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services in June 2014 after experience with large organizations in both the public and private sectors, and she oversees more than 77,000 employees. She has called for the department to operate under three guiding tenets: to deliver results on a wide range of complex issues, to strengthen the relationships that drive progress, and to build strong teams with the talent and focus needed to deliver impact for the American people.

Most recently Secretary Burwell served as director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), where she worked closely with Congress to help return to a more orderly budget and appropriations process. Prior to that, Secretary Burwell served as president of the Walmart Foundation in Bentonville, AR, where, during her tenure, the foundation surpassed $1 billion in total giving. She was president of the Global Development Program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, WA, where she spent 10 years and served as the foundation’s first chief operating officer.

During the Clinton administration, Secretary Burwell served as deputy director of OMB, deputy chief of staff to the president, chief of staff to the secretary of the Treasury, and staff director of the National Economic Council. She has served on the boards of the Council on Foreign Relations, MetLife, and the University of Washington Medical Center, among other organizations.

2015 The Honorable Emanuel Cleaver, II, US House of Representatives, Missouri

The Honorable Emanuel Cleaver, II, is a United Methodist pastor and a member of the US House of Representatives. Rep. Cleaver currently represents Missouri’s 5th congressional district, where he has served since 2005. In January 2010, Rep. Cleaver became Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus. He has received five honorary doctoral degrees augmented by a bachelor’s degree from Prairie View A & M and a master’s degree from St. Paul’s School of Theology of Kansas City.

Rep. Cleaver has been a strong advocate for patients and their caretakers. In the 113th Congress he introduced H. 1666, Patient Centered Quality Care for Life Act. This legislation seeks to create a patient-centered quality initiative for seriously ill individuals by establishing a national stakeholder strategic summit that includes an interdisciplinary advisory committee. It also forms a quality-of-life education and awareness initiative through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, provides funding for a healthcare workforce training program, and institutes a palliative care–focused research plan to lower cost and improve quality of care for patients with chronic conditions.

Rep. Cleaver, a native of Texas, is married to the former Dianne Donaldson. They have made Kansas City home for themselves and their four children.

2014 The Honorable Lois Capps, RN, a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from the 24th Congressional district of California

Congresswoman Lois Capps (D-CA), a Nurse and veteran member of the U.S. House of Representatives, has been a strong and vocal leader for the field of nursing on Capitol Hill since she was first sworn into Congress on March 17, 1998. She is a respected and effective leader, particularly on issues related to public health and patient care. As a Co-Chair of the Congressional Nurses Caucus, Lois Capps has fought to ensure that nursing has a “voice in the debate and seat at the table” for all major health care public policy debates and policy development on Capitol Hill and within the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS).

The Congresswoman and her amazing health care public policy team in Washington, DC have worked with HPNA’s members and leadership to better educate Members of Congress and their staff on issues involving hospice and palliative nursing. Most recently, Capps and her staff worked with HPNA to convene multiple Congressional briefings on Capitol Hill. These Congressional Briefings served as important strategic vehicles to promote the benefits and role of palliative nursing for patients and their families. These educational forums, attracting more than 50 Congressional offices and various federal agency officials, have allowed HPNA to highlight individual patient stories directly to key federal healthcare public policy decision-makers.

Working closely with Congresswoman Capps and her staff, HPNA has been able to garner support for many legislative and regulatory palliative nursing priorities, including co-sponsors for the Palliative Care and Hospice Educational Training Act (PCHETA). Given her rich history and background in the field of nursing, Capps is considered by many to be one of the top “go-to” healthcare leaders and experts in the U.S. Congress. She founded and serves as the Co-chair of the House Nursing Caucus. She also serves as Co-chair of the Congressional Heart and Stroke Coalition, the House Cancer Caucus, the Congressional School Health and Safety Caucus, National Marine Sanctuary Caucus, and the Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition. Capps is also honorary Vice-Chair of the LGBT Equality Caucus.

It is a great honor for HPNA to recognize such a selfless and committed leader as Congresswoman Lois Capps. Her leadership and steadfast support of nursing and the patient community is unparalleled. The hospice and palliative nursing community are grateful and look forward to continuing to work closely with the Congresswoman and her very dedicated staff.

The Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA) recognizes The Honorable Lois Capps (D-CA) as the organization’s 2014 recipient of the Presidential Citation.

2013 Mary Lynn McPherson, Pharm.D. BCPS CPE

Mary Lynn McPherson is currently Professor and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, Maryland. She serves as a Hospice Consultant Pharmacist and is a Fellow in the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, American Pharmacists Association, American Society of Consultant Pharmacists and the American Society of Pain Educators. Dr. McPherson has had an active and long-standing program of research on the appropriate use of medications at end of life. Her passion for interprofessional education and research, particularly in pain management and palliative care, has contributed to her long-standing relationship with the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly and HPNA. She has authored and reviewed many HPNA publications, participated in the development of medication-related policies for the association and with her engaging and witty presentation style has educated countless professionals through other HPNA educational symposiums.

2013 N. Burl Cain

N. Burl Cain was named Warden of Louisiana State Penitentiary (LSP) in January 1995 byLouisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections. Known for his approaches in prison management, Warden Cain holds a degree from Louisiana State University and a master’s degree in Criminal Justice from Grambling State University and has more than 30 years of experience in corrections. He is the longest-standing warden in the history of LSP.

The Louisiana State Penitentiary (Angola) has a hospice program that is a part of the rehabilitation treatment offered to inmates. Angola was the second prison in the United States to start a hospice program. Since then, the program has grown to include dozens of inmate volunteers who go through a rigorous screening and training process. In their final hours, some inmates at Angola tend to the needs of other convicted criminals. Warden Burl Cain said it is a way for people known as “selfish takers” to finally give back.

2012 Donna E. Shalala, PhD

President Shalala has more than 30 years of experience as an accomplished scholar, teacher, and administrator. In 1993, President Clinton appointed her U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) where she served for eight years. In 2007, President George W. Bush handpicked Dr. Shalala to co-chair the Commission on Care for Returning Wounded Warriors, to evaluate how wounded service members transition from active duty to civilian society. In 2009 she was appointed chair of the Committee on the Future of Nursing at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Donna E. Shalala, PhD

Dr. Shalala has more than four dozen honorary degrees and a host of other honors. In 2008, she was presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award; and in 2010 she received the Nelson Mandela Award for Health and Human Rights, which recognizes individuals for outstanding dedication to improving the health and life chances of disadvantaged populations in South Africa and internationally.

2011 Congresswoman Carolyn McCarthy

Currently serving her 8th term representing Long Island’s 4th Congressional District, Representative Carolyn McCarthy was first elected in 1996 and has served in Congress for over 12 years. A life-long resident of Mineola, NY, she has over 30 years experience as a nurse. Rep. McCarthy holds many honors. She is the first Congresswoman from Long Island and is included in Newsday’s 100 Long Island Influentials, Long Island Business News’ Long Island Top 50, Congressional Quarterly’s 50 Most Effective Legislators, Redbook Magazine’s Mothers and Shakers and the Ladies’ Home Journal 100 Most Important Women.

Congresswoman McCarthy successfully fought to have language included in the Higher Education Opportunity Act, signed into law in 2009, which addresses the nurse shortage crisis. The bill provides for increased numbers of nurse faculty to train new nurses, a loan forgiveness program for new nurses, and requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services to investigate constraints encountered by schools of nursing in admitting and graduating the number of registered nurses. The Congresswoman also introduced the Nurse Training and Retention Act. This bill would provide grants to help provide training to ancillary healthcare workers who are interested in becoming nurses. The bill also provides for continuing education for nurses. Congresswoman McCarthy was able to include this legislation as a part of H.R. 3962, the Affordable Health Care for America Act.

2010 Congresswoman Lois Capps

Congresswoman Capps has supported the HPNA mission by leading Congress on issues of public health, passing legislation to address the national nursing shortage, helping people improve their daily lives through quality health care, and providing immediate Medicare coverage to patients suffering from Lou Gehrig’s disease. Capps serves on the powerful Committee on Energy and Commerce and is the Vice Chair of its Health Subcommittee. She also sits on the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment. From these posts, Capps continues to focus on Medicare reform, the nursing shortage, and cancer.

During her 20-year tenure as a nurse and health advocate for the Santa Barbara School District, thousands of Santa Barbara’s children and families benefited from Capps’ personal care and leadership. Capps draws on this extensive healthcare background as founder and co-chair of the House Nursing Caucus. She also serves as co-chair of the Congressional Heart and Stroke Coalition, the House Cancer Caucus, the Congressional School Health and Safety Caucus, and the House Democratic Task Force on Health.

Capps was born in Ladysmith, Wisconsin on January 10, 1938. After graduating with honors from Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing, she worked as a nursing instructor in Portland, Oregon. Capps earned a Master of Arts degree in Religion from Yale University while working as Head Nurse at Yale New Haven Hospital. In addition, she earned a Master of Arts degree in Education from the University of California, Santa Barbara and received honorary doctorates from Pacific Lutheran University and Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. 

HPNA Chapter Communication Award

The HPNA Chapter Communication Award recognizes and rewards excellence in communication within chapters utilizing printed and/or electronically published vehicles. Eligible communication methods can come from various vehicles, including but not limited to newsletters, electronic newsletters, email announcements, posters, exhibiting materials, postcards, letters, and announcements. Award winners will receive an official HPNA Awards Certificate, which will be presented at the HPNA Leadership Weekend*. A maximum of 3 award winners will be considered annually.

HPNA Recruitment and Retention Award

The HPNA Recruitment and Retention Award recognizes an HPNA Chapter that has excelled in promoting membership and retention within their chapter and national organization. The winning chapter will receive an official HPNA Award Certificate, which will be presented at the HPNA Leadership Weekend*. A maximum of 3 award winners will be considered annually.

Outstanding Research Abstract Award

Award Criteria

The HPNA Outstanding Research Abstract Award recognizes the top scoring research abstract accepted for a podium presentation at the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly. The recipient is selected from HPNA members who submit abstracts submitted for research presentations at the Annual Assembly.

Award

A plaque is presented to the lead author at the time the paper is presented. The recipient is also acknowledged at the HPNA Annual Membership Meeting.*

Eligibility

Lead author must be a current member of HPNA and a nurse. (Members of the HPNA Board of Directors and members of the Awards Subcommittee are ineligible.)

Criteria

An individual who has positively influenced end-of-life nursing care by having a presentation accepted at the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly during the research call. Review criteria are as follows:

  • Conclusions are consistent with the study results and
  • Research findings are relevant to the practices of hospice and palliative care and
  • Study adds to existing knowledge and
  • Study represents an innovative/cutting-edge topic and
  • Study has significance/importance/relevance to hospice and palliative care and
  • Abstract is well written and clearly communicated and
  • The purpose of the study is clearly stated and
  • The study design is appropriate for the question being asked and
  • The findings are presented clearly
Judging

The Research Committee of the HPNA and the Board of Directors review the results of the abstract evaluations done by the Annual Assembly Scientific Program Committee and select the award winner.

The award winner is strongly encouraged to attend the HPNA Annual Membership Meeting to be acknowledged in person. The recipient is responsible for all travel costs.

Past Award Recipients
2015 Marie A. Bakitas, DNSc ACHPN CRNP

“Depression Moderates the Positive Impact of Early Palliative Care on Survival Among Advanced Cancer Patients”

2014 Debra Wiegand, MBE PhD RN CCRN FAAN FPCN

“Family Experiences During the Dying Process After Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy”

2013 Sally Norton, PhD RN FPCN

“Linking Prognoses, Treatment Paths, And Values In Goals-of-Care Conversations”

2012 Dr. Joy Buck, RN MSN PhD

Dr. Joy Buck holds a joint appointment with the School of Nursing and the Department of Family Medicine, Eastern Division at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia. Her research has been funded by the National Institute for Nursing Research and the American Nurses Foundation and her dissertation won the prestigious Phyllis J. Verhonick Distinguished Research Award from the University of Virginia. She has done extensive historical research on the development of hospice and palliative care in the United States and completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania.

With an expansive clinical background in community-based HIV/AIDS and chronic care, Dr. Buck’s research focuses on health-related quality of life in complex chronic illness, rural health disparities, integrated palliative care, and the intersection of policy and clinical outcomes.

2011 Jennifer Kowalkowski, BSN

Jennifer Kowalkowski, BSN, of Madison, WI is the 2011 recipient of this award for her abstract, “Dane County End-of-Life Coalition: Building Partnerships to Improve Care.”

2010 Karen Kehl, RN, PhD, ACHPN®

This year, Dr. Kehl won the award for her research, “Readability of Hospice Materials to Prepare Families for Death”. Dr. Kehl’s research focus is preparing hospice families for death in the home with the goals of developing a tailored intervention, which will take into account the patient’s condition and family needs.

Dr. Kehl is a Research Associate on faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has served as a nurse for 25 years, including specializing in hospice and palliative care for 20 years. She started her work in hospice and palliative care as clinical director for Beloit Hospice in Beloit, Wisconsin. Dr. Kehl has been featured as an invited conference and educational course speaker on many end-of-life topics and is a certified Advanced Practice Certified Hospice and Palliative Nurse (ACHPN®).

2009 Terrah L. Foster, PhD, RN, CPNP

Dr. Foster won the award for her research, “Bereaved Parents and Siblings Continue Bonds with Children Who Died of Cancer”. The purpose of this study was to examine how bereaved family members continue bonds with children who died from cancer. Participants included 107 bereaved parents and siblings of 41 children who died from cancer. Families were recruited 3-12 months after the death at three children’s hospitals in the United States and Canada. Researchers conducted semi-structured home interviews, asking open-ended questions with each family member separately.

Dr. Foster’s findings demonstrated that parents and siblings identified two major categories of continuing bonds. Participants purposely chose triggers to remember deceased children (e.g., keeping visual representations, keeping personal belongings, visiting locations children occupied, engaging in activities to honor children, communicating with children, doing things children liked). Secondly, grieving family members experienced nonpurposeful triggers that reminded them of deceased children (e.g., dreams, signs/visits from children, feeling children’s presence). Most parents and siblings experienced comforting effects from purposeful and nonpurposeful memories; they chose to avoid reminders when discomforting effects occurred.

The results of this study suggest that continuing bonds may be a helpful coping strategy for bereaved family members and contributes to the knowledge about continuing bonds. Implications for practice include promoting awareness of the nature of continuing bonds among both families and healthcare providers and facilitating opportunities for bereaved families to continue bonds with deceased children. Both are strategies for optimizing aftercare for surviving family members.

Dr. Foster is an Assistant Professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing.

2008 Suzanne Prevost, RN, PhD

Dr. Suzanne Prevost won this award for her research, “End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes is Gradually Improving.” Dr. Prevost performed a secondary analysis of minimum data set (MDS) assessment data from 103 nursing homes in order to document recent trends in end of life care. MDS assessment data were linked with mortality data for individuals residing in those facilities from January, 2004, through December, 2006. The date set included over 31,000 residents for each year 2004 through 2006.

Prevost’s findings demonstrated an increasing incidence of dying residents who had “Do Not Resuscitate” orders, from 46.9% at the beginning of 2004 to 77.6% at the end of 2006. Also, the percent of residents who were identified as “terminal” prior to death increased from 15.3% in 2004 to 17.8% 2006. Hospice use among residents who died also increased, from 8.3% to 13.5%, while the proportion of residents who received tube feedings during their last three months of life decreased, from 9.6% to 7.7%. Chi-square tests for each of these changes were significant at p < 0.001.

While these findings demonstrate improvements in end of life care, they also support the belief that the dying trajectory is frequently under documented and many residents who might benefit from hospice care do not receive it.

Dr. Prevost is Professor and Chairholder, NHC Chair of Nursing Excellence, at the School of Nursing at Tennessee University. Her research areas include outcome evaluation, pain management, pressure ulcer prevention, and cost effectiveness.

2007 Gina Santucci, RN, MSN

Gina Santucci, RN, MSN provided a poster on her research, “Nurses Assessment of Pediatric Care: A Hospital-Wide Survey.”

The study analyzed responses from 410 pediatric nurses at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, gathered through a web-based survey. The survey asked such questions as whether nurses were comfortable working with dying children and their families and inquired about their knowledge, attitudes, practices and experiences regarding aspects of palliative and end-of-life care. The survey also used questions from a standardized measuring tool called the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale.

Santucci found that nurses who were more confident about their skills also were more likely to have received education in palliative care. The more hours of palliative care education that a nurse received, the more comfortable the nurse was in providing palliative care and in talking about death and dying with patients and families. Education enlarges the set of “pathway thoughts” a person may have when considering how to achieve a goal, and may expand the range of potentially desired goals.

The study appeared in the January 2007 issue of Pediatrics.

Ms. Santucci serves as a member of the Pediatric Advanced Care Team at Children’s Hospital, providing palliative, end-of-life and bereavement services.

Outstanding Research Poster Awards

HPNA Outstanding Research Poster Award Award recognizes HPNA members who present the top scoring poster at the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly. Award winning poster(s) are selected by a panel of judges during an onsite review at the Annual Assembly.

Award

Ribbons are affixed to the posters during the opening session. The primary poster author will also receive a certificate and be acknowledged at the HPNA Annual Membership Meeting.*

Eligibility

Lead author must be a current member of HPNA and a nurse. (Members of the HPNA Board of Directors and members of the Awards Subcommittee are ineligible.)

Criteria

An individual who has positively influenced palliative nursing care by having a poster accepted at the AAHPM/HPNA Annual Assembly during the research call.

  • Originality and
  • Methods and
  • Clarity of Presentation and
  • Usefulness/Applicability
Judging

A panel of judges selected by the HPNA Research Committee reviews the poster display at the Annual Assembly and selects the award winner(s).

The award winner is strongly encouraged to attend the HPNA Annual Membership Meeting to be acknowledged in person. The recipient is responsible for all travel costs.

Member Volunteer Recognition

HPNA is only as robust as its membership.

In order to accomplish the important work that needs to be completed to fulfill our Mission, it is essential that HPNA members offer their time, expertise, and energy to improve hospice and palliative care nursing by assuring a high standard of quality for all products and services.

The HPNA Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer recognize the contributions of our members in 2015. Voluntary activities include but are not limited to: State Ambassadors; editors and authors of education products or materials; reviewers of education products; presenters for teleconferences and webinars; members of Advisory Councils; Chapter leadership; contributors to the newsletters; and more! Nearly 400 HPNA members donated over 4,000 hours to the work of the association.

Thank you for your gift of time. Thank you for investing in your professional organization.

HPNA Member Volunteers
Tim Adams
Stacie Addy
Carrie Alani
Jane Andersen
Stacy Anguiano
Maria Ash
Deidra Atwood
Julia Aucoin
Nancy Auster
Margaret Avery-Robinson
Debra Bach
Judith Baggs
December Bailey
Marie Bakitas
Pamela Barbour
Kristine Barton
Tara Baudoin
Kathleen Beaver
Kathryn Beck
Sheila Berrigan
Patricia Berry
Ami Bhatt
Sheri Bishop
Carol Boaz
Ellen Boehmer
Susan Breakwell
Anna Brock
Kathleen Broglio
Cheryl Brohard
Pamela Brown
Rose Brown
Shannon Brown
Julie Brumley
J Britt Bullard
Jeri Burn
Danielle Burngasser
Margaret Campbell
Joan Carpenter
Anne Carr
Jacqueline Carrillo
Debra Carter
Deana Chitambar
Tracy Christofilis
Jamie Cicali
Tracy Clark
Dena Clayton
Rebecca Cline
Jeannette Coane
Jonathan Cohen
Teresa Congdon
Lori Constantine
Pamela Cook
Susan Cox
Mary Crean
Maryellen Cubbon
Constance Dahlin
Helen Dally
Barbara Daly
Dianne Dayton McLean
Lyn De Silets
Katherine Demarco
Heather Demaris
Maria Depasquale
Shiela Derrevere
Susan Desanto-Madeya
Stephanie Desiderio
Melinda Diaz
Elizabeth Diener
Bette Dileonardi
Donna Dimartino
Betty Ditillo
Mary Dixon
Margaret Donegan
Beverly Douglas
Kim Dudley
Patricia Dziabis
Rachel Eddings
Diana Ehrlich
Debbie Elgaouni
Cynthia Elliott
Dianne Ellis
Cathy Emmett
Caroline Etland
Bradley Evans
Ellen Farrell
Annette Feierman
Rita Ferguson
Maryellen Field
Colleen Fleming-Damon
Susan Folk
Lisa Foreman
Marlene Foreman
Jennifer Fournier
Erica Frechman
Bonnie Freeman
Beth Frigerio
Beverlee Furner
Rebecca Gagne-Henderson
Lawrence Garner
Shirlee Garringer
Adrianne Gasper
Kathryn Gearhart
Pamela Geller
Joan Gettelfinger
Stephanie Gilbertson-White
Irene Gilliland
Catherine Glennon
Joy Goebel
Kimberly Goff
Jessica Goggin
Tiffany Gordon
Theresa Grano
Marian Grant
Sheila Grant
Deborah Grassman
Marilyn Graves
Deborah Greenspan
Christine Greenwald
Colette Greer Daniel
Kristi Griffith
Christina Grismer
Pamala Grottanelli
Maryellen Grounds
Susan Grzywinski
Susan Guerino
Tamara Guinn
Debbie Gunter
Jennifer Hale
Christine Harlander
April Harrelson
Jacqueline Hart
Barbara Head
Sandra Hebley
Richelle Hooper
Ruthanne Hoover
Jay Horton
Cynthia Howard
Cheryl Hoyt
James Huff
Susan Hurley
Deborah Imbach
Lesley Istre
Shigeko Izumi
Mimi Jenko
Sandra Jense
Susan Jessell
Marylyn Johns
Wanda Johnson
Marianne Johnstone-Petty
Carla Jolley
Gina Jones
Nancy Joyner
Maryann Jurek
Diane Kaiser-Partridge
Francine Kane
Genevieve Keeney
Mary Kenney
Guy Keplinger
Kimberly Kidd
Terry Kilbury
Laura Kingston
Shirley Kinser
Kathie Kobler
Niki Koesel
Susan Koff
Gwen Kolegue
Kevin Kramer
A Andrew Kuhn
Harlee Kutzen
Kerstin Lappen
Teree Lartigue
Mindy Lawrence
Judith Lentz
Christine Leppo
Brandy Leroy
Marijo Letizia
Lauren Lewis
Lisa Lindley
Patricia Linyard
Sarah Livermore
Mary Long
Susan Lowey
Colleen Lowry
Gretchen Luke
Maureen Lynch
Julia Macmillan
Angela Mager
M Mahon
Pam Malloy
Lisa Manthey
Steven Marciano
Holli Martinez
Jeanne Martinez
Christine Mastropietro
Carol Matheny
Clare Matis
Masako Mayahara
Murray Mayo
Wilma Mcadams
Sue Mcgann-Osborne
Stephen Mcgowan
Elizabeth Mcgrath
Kathleen Mcgrath
Matthew Mcgraw
Marlene Mchugh
David Mckinney
Jamie Mcnamara
Becky Mcreynolds
Deborah Medakovich
Meggan Mikal
Linda Millar
Pamela Miller
Joan Millican
Barbara Milot
Ann Minor
Christen Molter
Debbie Monaghan
Kathleen Moneymaker
Bridget Montana
Anne Moore
Betty Morgan
Bonnie Morgan
Sue Morgan
Bertha Morin
Rebecca Mott
Sandra Muchka
Kay Mueggenburg

Barbara Mulich
Karen Mulvihill
Cindy Muron
Mary Murphy
Laura Murray-Rivera
Lola Nation
Deborah Nicholson
Rhonda Oakes
Elizabeth Oberhausen
Petique Oeflein
Theresa Oherron
Maria Olivier
Edith Oneil-Page
Pamela Ortner
Darryl Owens
Denise Oyler
Luis Pacini
Judith Paice
Joyce Palmieri
Jacqueline Palmore
Joan Panke
Jodi Pascal
Margaret Paterson
Beverly Paukstis
Janette Perasso
Kathleen Perko
Barbara Piskor
Amanda Potter
Jennifer Powers
Evelyn Quast
Linda Quinlin
David Rahn
Christine Ratto
Janette Raymond-Torgbede
Monique Reese
Melissa Ring
Nancy Robertson
Quinten Robertson
Carol Robinson
Kathryn Robinson
Nancy Romanchek
Pamela Rowland
Nikki Ruggles
Elizabeth Sage
Millie Salkind
Deanne Sayles
Sandra Lee Schafer
Helen Schlessinger
Barbara Schmal
Tasha Schoppee
Tamara Scott
Ryan Shaw
Petti-Jeanne Sheldon
Dot Sieferman
Lisa Sigsworth
Kimberly Simmons
Laura Smith
Stacy Smith
Angel Smothers
Susan Sovine
Mary Spicketts
Michael St John
Sandy Stacy
Cindy Stafford
Denise Stahl
John Stanko
Dana Steen
Carol Stephenson
Pamela Stephenson
Sherra Stewart-Rego
Joann Stoll
Debbie Stoughton
Nicole Strauss
Jennifer Stravelakis
Joan Strohm
Patricia Strunk
Denellen Sutherland
Barbara Sutton
Stacy Tackett
Debra Teesdale
Alice Teeter
Amyjo Terry
Cheryl Thaxton
Rosalie Thomas
Debra Thompson
Deborah Thorpe
Pamela Tucker
Craig Turner
Robyn Vandusen
Karen Vekasy
Theresa Vickey
Christina Visco
Kellie Wade
Cathy Wagner
Karen Wahle
Anne Walsh
Heron Warren
Kimberly Watson
Patricia Weaver
Beth Werner
Jacqueline Westbrook
Christine Westphal
Julie Wickline
Janet Wills
Jean Wilson
Elizabeth Winders
M Rae Woods
Alyson Yost
Kristopher Young
Sara Yuhnke
Richard Zarandin
Patricia Zeimet
Christine Zinn
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Award for Innovation in Palliative Nursing

This award, which was discontinued in 2010, recognized the work of an HPNA member in developing an innovation that has resulted in positive changes in palliative nursing.

2008 Kelley Scott, BSN, RN, CHPN®

Kelley Scott, RN, CHPN®, is being recognized for her work in establishing Clarehouse, a home for end-of-life care in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She serves as Executive Director at Clarehouse. Ms. Scott was working as a hospice nurse with a hospice organization when she recognized an unmet community need: terminally ill patients without equate caregiver support were unable to access hospice services. No residential hospice services existed; and for those individuals who could not afford private nursing care, the hospitals and long-term care facilities were not an adequate solution for patients wanting to die at home.

2007 Jill Z. Bixby, APRN, MS, MA, CHPN

Ms. Bixby won the award for her continued contributions to end-of-life, including the creation of the performance piece, “B.O.A.T.I.N.G.” (Before Offering Another Treatment Identify New Goals). “B.O.A.T.I.N.G.” is a one-act play that provides insight into the benefits and burdens of treatment at the end of life. Using the metaphor of a non-swimmer, “B.O.A.T.I.N.G.” is able to address end of life issues with greater impact than a more formal presentation might. A deeply moving play, “B.O.A.T.I.N.G.” has proved to be instructive not only for the medical staff for whom it was originally designed, but for interested community members as well.

2006 Hazel Jackson, RN, MSN

A nursing veteran, Hazel is being honored for her work at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) in Decatur, Georgia, where she developed and helped implement a comprehensive hospice program that improved quality of care and care options available to dying veterans. Hazel was the only registered nurse invited to serve on the Department of Veterans Affair’s Hospice and Palliative Care Initiative. She has shared her expertise in the development and implementation of contract hospice care with other VAMCs around the
country.

2005 Monica White, RN, MSN, OCN, CHPN®

Monica, a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Adult Health at Heart’s Way Hospice in Longview, Texas, established a monthly interdisciplinary continuing education program for end of life caregivers from the fields of nursing, social work and chaplaincy. Attendees over the past three years have been representatives of acute care settings, nursing homes, home health agencies, hospice and a cancer center. Monica also led her team of co-workers in the hospice’s implementation of an additional organizational goal to educate the health care community through an annual lectureship. The Seldon Graham Memorial Lectureship, honoring a community physician, has grown in attendance since being offered for the first time in 2001. The event, held annually in September, includes a catered dinner and speaker who delivers a keynote address on an aspect of care at the end of life. A co-worker states that “We have grown as a group and we have begun a growing initiative to educate people about what kind of care should exist at the end of life. ….there is nothing like this that has ever been offered in East Texas.”

2004 Mary E Murphy, RN, MS, AOCN, CHPN®

Mary currently works as a Hospice Clinical Nurses Specialist at the Hospice of Dayton. In 2000, Mary was awarded the Pride of Hospice Award in Management from the Hospice of Dayton. In 2001, Mary received both the Hospice Caregiver of the Year Award from the Ohio Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and the National Heart of Hospice Award Excellence in Management from NHPCO.
Mary developed a tutorial entitled “Palliative Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy: Future Challenges for Nursing” which includes didactic materials, case scenarios, self-learning packets for new staff, patient education packets, etc. which is accessible to all and will soon be placed on line.

2003 Dee Leslie, RN, CHPN®

Nine years ago, Dee Leslie, RN, CHPN®, created for Covenant Hospice, of Pensacola, Florida, a program to guide care of hospice patients in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other non-traditional home settings. During the years of managing that program, Covenant Hospice has seen end of life care of facility patients improve dramatically, especially in the areas of pain management on the collaborative, palliative care plans. In August 2002, her Partners in Care Toolkit won the “Award of Excellence” from the Florida Hospices and Palliative Care Association.

2002 Barbara Head, RN, CHPN®, ACSW

Barbara Head, RN, CHPN, ACSW served as President of the National Board for Certification of Hospice and Palliative Nurses in 1999 and 2000. In that capacity she led the certification board in meeting the needs of improving end-of-life care by embarking on the certification of nursing assistants. Barb’s innovation has lead to the recognition of a group of health care workers who have made a tremendous contribution but in the past have often been unrecognized. Barb’s vision and leadership have lead to the development of a certification examination, a defined scope and standards, and educational materials for the nursing assistant. Her innovation will influence the patient care these important members of the health care team will provide for years to come.

2001 Richard Folden, RN, CRNH

Nominated by his peers, Mr. Folden is the registered nurse of the continuous care team of Kanawha Hospice Care, Inc., located in West Virginia. Within his work role, Mr. Thomas has established himself as a respected advocate of quality end-of-life care. Mr. Folden’s forte is bedside nursing in the patient’s last few days or hours. This award gives recognition to his effective and creative problem solving of delivering medicines to patients who had problems with oral routes of administration. He devised a method to administer medications rectally without disturbing the patient’s position while increasing the caregiver’s ease and preserving patient dignity.

Marion Ryan Artistry in Palliative Nursing

This award, discontinued in 2010, recognized the creative work that captures the richness of carrying for persons with life limiting progressive illness. It was designed to honor the memory of Marion Ryan for her many creative contributions to HPNA.

2010 Hazel Jackson, RN, MSN, ACNS-BC, CHPN®

Ms. Jackson is being recognized for her artistic work for Heavenly Scene, a relaxation and guided imagery session that provides comfort for individuals battling a terminal illness. Originally written for a special patient in Ms. Jackson’s care, Heavenly Scene has been used in a variety of settings, including community support groups, patients and families conferences at the Atlanta Veterans Administration (VA) Community Living Center (CLC), and nursing staff meetings. The guided imagery session helps individuals to visualize their favorite place, a place where they feel safe, relaxed, and free – a personal “heaven”.

A nursing veteran, Hazel currently is working with the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) in Decatur, Georgia. Ms Jackson, a Palliative Care Team Nurse/Pain Resource Nurse, helps the VAMC to organize and implement a comprehensive hospice program that improves quality of care and care options available to dying veterans.

2009 Ellen Metzger, RN, CHPN®

Ms. Metzger is being recognized for her artistic work as a soprano soloist and lyricist in the development of Palliative Care Productions Presents singing “The Symptom Management Blues”, a unique musical arrangement about symptom management for a nursing grand rounds venue. Musical performances include “I’m a Palliator” to the tune of “I’m a Woman”, “PAIN” to the music of “Summertime” from Grease, “Constipation” to the tune of “How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria” from the Sound of Music. These songs, which were first performed during National Hospice and Palliative Care Month, proved to have a positive change in practice patterns due to the creative method of teaching.

Currently working at York Hospital in York, Pennsylvania, Ellen has over twenty years of experience in the field of hospice and palliative care. Ellen has help York Hospital, a community based teaching hospital, embrace the empowerment model in that all hospital clinicians can learn and employ palliative care principles through creative education.

2008 Kathy Meyer, RN, CHPN®

Kathy Meyer, RN, BS, CHPN, received the award for her work, Hope in the Night: Hymns of Inspiration and Comfort, a CD of collected hymns specifically designed to bring comfort to hospice families. Working as an on-call nurse at the Hospice of Visiting Nurse Service in Akron, Ohio, Ms. Meyer witnessed the comfort her patients and their families found in their favorite hymns, noting that the type of music has universal appeal, crossing boundaries of different faiths. With this in mind, she assembled the Peace Together Choir, an interfaith choir made up of vocalists and musicians from area choirs, to record a CD of inspirational hymns. The CD contains such traditional songs as “Ave Maria,” “On Eagle’s Wings,” “Amazing Grace,” and others. Each piece was carefully arranged and adapted, the choir rehearsing for long hours to perfect their renditions of the hymns.

2007 Diana M. Hershey, RN

Diana Hershey, RN is recognized for a portfolio of creative work that includes photographs of patients at end-of-life, a grief journal, and songs individually composed for dying patients. While these works were originally intended primarily as gifts to hospice patients and families, they have evolved to become recognized as artistic expressions in their own right, while serving as practical tools for helping patients and families confront the difficult issues of death and bereavement.

Currently Ms. Hershey is a Hospice RN Case Manager for Companion Hospice Care in Orange, California. Ms. Hershey presents in-services on pain management to the area’s nursing schools including California State Long Beach, Cerritos College, and Long Beach City College.

Ms. Hershey is working on incorporating her artistic works into a presentation on end-of-life care, to be used in educating community health care workers and other providers. She is also working on incorporating her work into a photo documentary book focusing on “living at the end of life.”

2005 Kate Parker, RN

The first Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association’s Marion Ryan Artistry in End-of-Life Nursing Care Award will be presented to Kate Parker, RN.

Kate has sketched and drawn since she can remember. It was while living and working in the Persian Gulf that she first attempted painting with watercolors. Her two loves of nursing and painting were brought together in the book of hospice stories called Dying With Joy and Sorrow: True Stories from the Beside of the Dying, for which she created sixteen paintings depicting scenes from the stories in the book. The artistry nominated for this award is one of these watercolor scenes with butterflies depicting tears of joy and sorrow as Butterfly Kisses was sung at a wedding in which a father was able to give is daughter away before his death.

Kate, a registered nurse for twenty-five years who received her training in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, is a hospice nurse providing care in east central Florida.

Project Death in America/HPNF Leadership Award
HPNF Individual Education Scholarships
HPNF Certification Research Grant
STTI/HPNF End-of-Life Nursing Care Research Grant
Butterfly and Star Chapter Awards

2016 HPNA Chapter Awardees
Butterfly Chapter (every member participated!)
Star Chapter (up to $99)
One Star Chapter ($100 to $249)
  • East Central Iowa – new participant
Two Star ($250 to $499)
Three Star ($500 to $999)
  • Chicagoland ~ 7 year participant
  • Fort Worth ~ 8 year participant
Four Star ($1,000 or greater)
  • San Francisco Bay Area ~ 6 year participant

Congratulations and thank you to these chapters for advancing expert care in serious illness! Find our how to support HPNF through the Star Chapter and Butterfly Chapter Recognition Program.

Save the Dates

Mark you calendar for the Annual Assembly of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association.

  • 2018: March 14-17, Boston, MA
  • 2019: March 13-16, Orlando, FL
  • 2020: March 18-21, San Diego, CA

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